289 Hi-Po: 1967 Ford Mustang Fastback

This 1967 Mustang Fastback has been in the care of its current owner for more than 30-years. It exhibits all of the hallmarks of a classic that has been treated with respect, and its overall condition is above average for a driver-quality car. All good things must come to an end, so the owner has taken the hard decision to part with the Fastback. It is located in Concord, California, and has been listed for sale here on eBay. It is no great surprise that plenty of people like what they see because there have already been 31 bids submitted. This action has pushed the price beyond the reserve, and it currently sits at $40,800.

If this Dark Moss Green Mustang has spent most of its life in California, that could be great news for potential buyers. When this car rolled off the production line, Ford was not renowned for its rust prevention measures. However, they weren’t alone in this, so finding rust problems in these classics is pretty common. Thankfully, that doesn’t appear to be the case here. Looking below the beautiful gloss exhibited by the paint, the panels look remarkably clean. There is nothing visible in any lower body extremities, and the owner mentions no issues with the floors or frame. He offers access to these photos via Facebook, and the floors and frame are as clean as you could ever hope to find. Looking beyond the question of rust, the panels are extremely straight, with no evidence of dings, dents, or possible previous accident damage. The glass is in good order, as is the chrome. The Fastback rolls on factory styled steel wheels, and these look as nice as the rest of the exterior.

The VIN for this classic indicates that it was ordered with the C-Code 289ci V8 that produced a reasonable 200hp. However, who can’t use more power? The owner says that what we find nestled under the hood is the 289ci Hi-Po V8, which I assume is the K-Code motor. This would’ve punched out a very healthy 271hp, and in this case, that power finds its way through a 4-speed manual transmission to a 3.50 Equa Lock rear end. The owner has fitted a Cobra intake, a Holley 600cfm carburetor, and Tri-Y headers. Those components should liberate a few extra ponies, so this car should be able to improve on a regular K-Code’s 14.8-second ¼-mile ET. As seems to be the case with the rest of this classic, the Mustang’s drivetrain is in excellent health. The owner supplies this series of videos of the vehicle running and driving. That little 289 sounds as sweet as a nut, and there are no apparent problems with the rest of the mechanical components.

Admit it. You’ve been waiting for me to dump some bad news on you. Sorry, but when we turn our attention to the interior, it presents as nicely as the rest of the vehicle. It is presented in Black vinyl, and I am struggling to find any faults or problems. The upholstered surfaces are free from wear or physical damage, the carpet shows no issues, while the dash, pad, and headliner are all in as-new condition. The Hurst shifter is a later addition, but it is about the only deviation that we will find from the factory specifications. Nobody has messed with this interior to fit an updated stereo or aftermarket gauges. If the buyer ever tires of the tune being sung by the 289, all they need to do is flick on the AM radio, and they’ve got some in-car entertainment.

Since I first laid my eyes on the early 1st Generation Mustang Fastbacks, I have had the perfect version pictured in my head. It was a ’66 in Ivy Green with a K-Code and a 4-speed. This car is a year later and wears Dark Moss instead of Ivy, but it is close enough that I wouldn’t argue if I found it parked in my garage. It is a clean and tidy vehicle that appears to be rust-free, and the owner could hold their head high if they rocked up at a Cars & Coffee. Sadly, I’m not in a position to park this in my garage at present, but you might be. If that is the case, maybe you need to look more closely at this classic. If you do buy it, I will envy you. I’m also available if you would like a chauffeur, and I’d do the job for free if it were behind the wheel of this little gem.

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Comments

  1. jnard90 jnard90 Member

    Wow, a real beauty. Great color.

    Like 15
  2. CCFisher

    The headline for this article is a big tease to us Mustang guys. The 289 HiPo was still available in 1967, but only 489 were built. If it were a real, 1967 K-code, it might not be worth more than a big block, but it would generate more interest at a show.

    Like 3
    • Jost

      Agreed. I had a friend who had 289k code 67. I have not seen him in probably 40 years. I often wonder if he still has it. Last time I saw him it was his intent to keep it as he knew how rare it was.

    • Marshall King

      Didn’t know how rare these were! My girlfriend, now wife, had one of these! Hers was the same green, GT with 289/ 4 speed. Fun car! Had serious rust issues and a cracked spring housing, so it was sold for cheap dollars. Had I known just how rare it was, I would have fought to keep it!

      Like 2
  3. Mike

    Hummm… A green mustang and a black Charger posted on BF back to back. A coincidence or some sort of knowing nod to Bullitt?

    Like 19
  4. Arby

    Needs gray American mags.

    Like 5
  5. jokacz

    I can understand why they made so few K-codes that year. What was the point of ordering one? Not that fast, but they had to handle better than with a 390 boat anchor up front. That 14.8 quarter time is a dream, GT350’s did 15’s stock.

    Like 1
    • William Sargent

      Bought my ’67 new with 289 225hp, A code. Ran mid 15s bone stock with 6.95 tires. Bigger Goodyear tires, dual exhaust with Hypo manifolds and steel shim head gaskets broke the 8 inch rear end. So a 9 inch still with 3.00 gears and a clutch fan from a 390 with A/C and it ran 14.70s. Have since replaced the original engine with a HyPo with Ford Muscle Parts hydraulic cam and 351 W heads. Everything else still same last time out many years ago it ran 14.40s. That’s still with full exhaust and 3.00 gears. Plenty of room for improvement, but old age is getting to me more than it is to the Mustang. Incidentally it looks and is equipped much like the one in the article.

      Like 1
    • William Sargent

      Bought my ’67 new with 289 225hp, A code. Ran mid 15s bone stock with 6.95 tires. Bigger Goodyear tires, dual exhaust with Hypo manifolds and steel shim head gaskets broke the 8 inch rear end. So a 9 inch still with 3.00 gears and a clutch fan from a 390 with A/C and it ran 14.70s. Have since replaced the original engine with a HyPo with Ford Muscle Parts hydraulic cam and 351 W heads. Everything else still same last time out many years ago it ran 14.40s. That’s still with full exhaust and 3.00 gears. Plenty of room for improvement, but old age is getting to me more than it is to the Mustang. Incidentally it looks and is equipped much like the one in the article. Oh, the main reason I settled for a 225 instead of a 271 HyPo was the warranty. I needed a car to drive and the 3 month 3000 mile warranty that came with the Hypo wouldn’t do for me. Mine came with 5 year 50,000 mile.

    • CCFisher

      You answered your own question. The small-block was 200 lb lighter for better handling, and it was a rev-happy performance engine. The 390 placed emphasis on low-end torque to lug around LTDs and Country Squires. Only 489 Mustang buyers cared about handling over straight-line performance in 1967, it would seem.

  6. CraigR

    That green color alone assures interest

    Like 4
  7. Carbob Member

    My ‘67 fastback had the 390. Don’t recall it being a boat anchor. I do remember that it was extremely fast in 1970. Wish I could step into the way back machine and slam second again.

    Like 3
    • DaveWoo

      @Carbob You’re exactly right. One of the best things about the Ford FE big block is it’s relatively light weight, it’s the lightest of the muscle era big blocks. It weighs only about 150 pounds more than a Ford small block. In fact I always laugh when I hear comments on how much better the small block handles. Just like I’m laughing at the times claimed about some of these readers for their past and present small blocks.I call bulls&$t. In fact if you put a set of aluminum heads and intake, an aluminum water pump and light weight fan on an FE and it’s within fifty pounds of a stock 289/302. And with the big block you get something not available in any 289. Tire shredding torque.

      Like 1
      • jokacz

        Here we go again with the 390 apologists. The 390 with the big valve heads, solid lifters, and the tri-power was a good mill. The things they put in Mustangs, T-Birds, and whatever else, were slugs. And having owned a new 67 GT500, I can attest that with that big load of junk 428 up front, it handled like a snowplow.

  8. gaspumpchas

    Amen on the FE, guys. Worked for a guy who had a bullitt clone with the 390 4 bbl, and it was a monster. As Dave said, tire shredding torque. You really had to hang on to it in a curve, would break loose if you nailed it . Had original dual exhaust so it sounded just like the Bullitt car in the movie. Good stuff. Stay safe and happy motoring.
    Cheers
    GPC

    Like 2
  9. bog

    Looked this one over on ebay. 50K now. Non-original motor, trans and reared, mileage unknown, therefore not in upper strata price-wise. While on that site I also looked at bottom of page and saw a Whimbleton white GTA that according to dealer is correctly coded. I’d kicked myself for not buying a 390 GT Hi-Po new in ’67, and bought the Fairlane model from same dealership (thought I needed more space for my Army gear). That Fairlane served me well for 2 years of Autobahn driving, and I traded it in on a BOSS 351 I ordered on return from Germany. Wish I’d had the opportunity to drive either Mustang on the A’bahn !

  10. Kevin

    Very nice car,right shape,and color to mimic bullitt,but there’s enough tributes to it,the 289 was just a great engine, had one in a 67 cougar with just headers on the c code 2-barrel it would roast both tires with the posi,and btw Adam,nice touch in write up,in all my years of “gear heading”,I never heard equa lock rear end.

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