’64 And ’68 Karmann Ghia Projects

Karmann Ghias

The information provided by the seller is about as fuzzy as the pictures, but for $2200, perhaps there’s something worthwhile here. The 1968 is a parts car and the 1964 is hopefully rebuildable. Both cars are listed here on craigslist in Yuba City, California. I am confused about their math, as they say “i will sale a part 100 obo for the 64 or 800 obo for the 68 or both 2200 obo“, which doesn’t quite add up right. Are they saying if I came and bought each car separately, they would let me have both for just $900? Do you think there might be enough here to build one nice Karmann Ghia?

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. Gregory

    Question for all of us who love to read the auto “classifieds” what is with the words sale and sell? I noticed about three years ago how the two words are consistently used wrong in place of one another. I’m not a spelling nazi by any means but has Americans become such followers that we write the wrong grammer just because everyone else does. It makes you think twice if the owners description of the car is to be believed.

    • Grammerpa

      1. “…who love to read the auto “classifieds” what is…” Should be a period after “classifieds” and a new sentence starting with “What is…”
      2. “…but has Americans…” Should be “have Americans,” not “has Americans.”
      3. Should be a question mark (?) at the end of that sentence, not a period.
      4. “…if the owners description…” Should be owner’s (possessive), not owners.

      He who points out someone else’s grammar mistakes had better be darn sure his post contains no mistakes.

  2. sciguy58

    I love KG’s, but very few of the parts from the 68 will fit the 64. I hope at least one makes it back on the road.

  3. Audifan

    Lol. Talking about spelling, it would be grammar, not grammer.

    If I want to sale my car I would write a very nice for sell ad to make it sail out the door fast.

  4. Jose

    Hey Audifan,

    “I mean, like you know?”

  5. Doug M. (West Coast) Member

    My son and I just recently bought a 64 Ghia, as we have been noting their increase in value, and because they can be pretty nice looking when done right. What I learned is that the 64 is a pretty desirable year, as it has real metal and chrome trim parts rather than the polished aluminum parts that apparently started in 65ish. If those parts are missing, they can be hard to find and expensive. If those parts are all included, this could be a nice project. Of course, either way, it looks like there is a lot of work to do to put this all back together!

  6. Horse Radish

    This is one ad where less description would be more valuable.

    Put a phone number and be done.

    ’64 for $100 and ’68 for $800, but you can have both together for $2200 ????????

    Besides writing, this person has problems with math too.

    How do they make it through the day, let alone a week or longer….

  7. Rich

    Why does it look for all the world as if the roof has been cut off the donor car in one of the pictures? Also sloping Beetle headlights have been fitted so I would expect other 80’s/90’s era mods.

  8. OhU8one2

    I had a 64 Ghia way back in the 80’s. Mine was a coupe,dark green with a white top. The painted roof was extra,and I think it was textured if I’m not mistaken. Anyway I remember some part’s were expensive compared to the Beetle. One thing to point out is that the nose of the vehicle stick’s out past where the front bumper stop’s. Making the front center very vulnerable. Also the body of a Ghia has NO way of removing the damaged section. Fender’s don’t bolt on,they are welded and seams filled with lead or plastic filler to go the cheap route. To find a early Ghia with no previous nose damage is basically unheard of. Bodies were made by Karmann,who are highly skilled craftsmen. So plan on more expensive body repair’s if need be.

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