Affordable Project? 1965 Chevrolet El Camino

The 1965 Chevrolet El Camino was based on the Chevelle two-door station wagon and received a facelift for 1965. This El Camino is located in Pleasanton, Texas and is offered on here on Facebook Marketplace for $3,500.

Initially introduced in 1959 and canceled after the 1960 model, Chevrolet re-introduced the El Camino in 1964. Chevrolet sold approximately 35,000 El Camino’s every year between 1964 and 1967. This El Camino is equipped with the 283 V8 and three-speed manual transmission.  It is a column shifted which we used to call a “three on the tree.”

Multiple engine options were offered including the 194 and 230 cubic inch 6 cylinders, the 195 horsepower 283 cubic inch Turbo-Fire V8 and 327 cubic inch Turbo-Fire V8s generating  250, 300 and 350 horsepower respectively. This one is fitted with the 283 V8.

For the subject car, the engine is said to turn over but is not in running condition at this point. An aftermarket air conditioner is mounted under the barn dust-covered dash. The interior is rough and will need a full restoration before it can be enjoyed.

With a few rust holes in the floorboards, this would definitely be considered a project.  However, the car appears to not have been modified and could be restored while maintaining the 54 years of patina. For comparison, I recently saw a 1966 El Camino sell on Barrett Jackson for $19,000 plus buyer fees. Makes it kind of tempting, doesn’t it?

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Comments

  1. FordGuy1972

    Again, it’s rust not patina. This car needs everything; rust repair, complete interior, patina removal and a paint job. Then there’s the engine to deal with. Maybe it can be started but maybe it will need some freshening up, plus the engine bay is a mess.

    Looks like a lot of work and money needed but these are cool cars/trucks. I’m just wondering if you could restore it for less than a restored example is worth.

    4
  2. Mountainwoodie

    Left to die in the desert, what a shame. OR a flood car OR it spent its life in swampiest Mississippi.

    In ’72 while working at a little gas station in Frisco Colorado I often drove the owners’ Bronze ’65. I like these if you can find one that is original and driveable. This or a ’57 Ford Ranchero. Bucket list.

  3. Del

    All in, I agree.

    Going to take more money to revive than what its worth

    1
  4. Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

    If this were closer it’d be in our garage already!!!! I’d sell whatever I could afford to (my 1984 KZ1000P, the 15 full shelves of NOS/OE/assorted clean used parts to rebuild it, my wife’s 30 lb. Siamese cat.)-at this price it be a great project my wife and I could work on together.
    FWIW, she’s pretty car savvy and enjoys turning wrenches occasionally…

    4
  5. bigdoc

    If I had a garage it would be there

    2
  6. TimM

    I like it and there’s a ton of work to get it looking right!! Some soda blasting after it’s torn down will tell the real story!! It seems solid and if the panels don’t need replacing than it’s a great start!! If I didn’t have so many projects already I would definitely take one like this on!! I think the car is very salvageable and doing the work yourself would keep the cost down!! I’m thinking a big block with a 4 or 5 speed though!!

    1
  7. Johnmloghry Member

    Okay. Body work check. Paint work check. Engine work check. Trans work maybe. Wiring work probably. Chrome work check. It’s a work of love.
    God bless America

    2
  8. Del

    Unless you really want all the wrench pulling, and some guys do, I would suggest finding one already restored.

    You should be able to find one in number #2 condition for between 20 to 29 grand.

    Even if you do most of the work yourself its probably going to exceed 39 grand

    2
  9. Bob

    Why not get it to running right and drive it like there is no tomorrow

    3

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