All The Bits To Build On: 1971 Porsche 911 Targa

Unquestionably, the new Porsche Targa 4 GTS is of the most beautiful cars ever created. The wide haunch rear, the massive rims that show off over-sized disc brakes, and the iconic pop top that allows for the best of both solid or convertible driving experiences. And even though it’s nearing 50 years old, the 1971 Targa found here on eBay, is a survivor find ready to be restored to its family glory.

It’s probably important to note that since my first experience with anything with wheels (Corgi cars, Hot Wheels, or my stroller), I’ve been a Porsche guy. Since 2016 I’ve been lovingly and slowly reconstructing a ’55 550 of Cuban origins. The goal is to have it show worthy by the same year this Targa turns 50. And chances are, if you bought this beauty, you’d have a much better chance of driving a classic by 2021 than I do.

There seems to be a lot to work with, and a lot of work, in order to restore this original paint, original engine (pictured on the sellers photobucket site outside of the car with lots of rusty bits to build on), and original interior survivor. What I like about this project is that virtually all of the car is intact – badging, bumpers, rubber, lights, top, chrome, rims, rubber – which we all know makes it easier to jump right into a build, instead of spending untold online hours finding period perfect parts.

It’s not hard to map out the build plan, however, and it starts with rust work, then a bit more rust work, before you can really get to the rust work. The good news is not a ton is needed to rebuild the body, which seems relatively straight. Take a look at the additional pictures to get a sense of the engine work – easy if you’ve done it before, but a steep learning curve from the handful I’ve taken on. But in the end, you’ll have a reborn classic of the proud 911 Targa family, you’ll have a very expensive sports car, and you’ll certainly whizz past me on the open road!

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Comments

  1. Classic Steel

    wowsa I wish I would of stacked these old beaters in barns years ago myself..

    Say Porsche 911 and sell your home to have one..

  2. Bobsmyuncle

    What people always forget is that when a car is freshly painted all the parts stuck on it that looked ok with the ratty paint now look ratty themselves. And that is how the snowball becomes an avalanche. Add the cost of overhauling that motor and you have a iceberg sliding down the mountainside.

    I’m not saying don’t do it but there better be a lot of passion fueling this project.

  3. Dolphin Dolphin Member

    The car is from Iowa, not CA. Lots of metalwork to be done down low on the body and maybe even high up. Then a complete bare metal respray—-after regalvanizing. That will need expert skills and lots of hours in the shop.

    It’s good of the seller to post photos of some of the lower body areas, where it’s obvious that you could pretty much poke a screwdriver right through the bubbled areas of paint that aren’t backed up by solid metal…maybe even with your finger.

    Once the body is finished, it will need everything else looked at and probably everything replaced or rebuilt or at least worked on in detail. And I haven’t even had a look at the photobucket pics yet.

    With a car like this it’s easy to imagine why it has sat so long. Very few people would even consider tackling the work required, and even fewer could actually do it. Which I think explains why some of the cars that are as needy as this one end up sitting around for years until somebody buys it to resell.

    I would be very careful here. The pullback in Porsche values, but not in the prices of Porsche parts and expert work, would not make me want to take this project on. It’s probably best for someone who pretty much does these restorations for a living and has the shop, expertise, and spare parts to get the job done in a timely way.

  4. Andrew not amember

    Value , upside down etc, who cares? You love what you love and get fix it drive it.

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