Cheap SS: 1966 Chevrolet Impala Super Sport

After sitting in storage for more than 20-years, this 1966 Impala SS has coughed back into life, and it now needs someone to buy it who is willing to return the car to its former glory. I really have to thank Barn Finder local_sheriff for referring the classic Chevy to us. It is located in Bountiful, Utah, and has been listed for sale here on eBay. The owner says that he has set the reserve on the car “insanely low,” and with bidding having only reached $1,100, it has been met. It seems that he wasn’t kidding on that score.

If the owner’s description is accurate, then the SS has spent more than 20-years sitting idle in covered storage. While he supplies no verifying photos, he does say that the floors and frame are solid. The paint, which he describes ad “blue,” is pretty bad, but rust issues don’t appear to be too severe. There is rust visible in some of the vehicle’s lower surfaces such as the lower quarter panels and lower fenders, but the vast majority of this could be addressed with patches, rather than full panel replacement. There is a pretty sizeable dent in the leading edge of the passenger side front fender, but it isn’t beyond repair. As you look at the photos, you will notice that the car is wearing two different types of wheels. The owner has a complete set of each type, and the buyer is free to choose which set that they would like included in the sale. The worst piece of news is the fact that the vast majority of the glass is missing, while the windshield is also badly cracked. The owner states that he has located a complete glass kit online for around the $550 mark. However, I’ve undertaken some searching for this with no luck, so the buyer may have to get him to point them in the right direction on that one.

There are no engine photos for the Impala, but what we know is that it is fitted with a 327ci V8, a manual transmission, and power brakes. It sounds like the owner was pretty careful about preparing the engine to kick back into life after such an extended period of inactivity. Here he has been successful, and he supplies this Facebook video of the car starting and running, and that 327 sounds really nice. The cooling system has been given a flush, and the car runs nicely without getting hot. The wiring under the dash has been replaced due to the fact that it has been chewed, and a number of rear brake components have also been replaced. These will now need bleeding, which will be one of the tasks that the buyer will face, while the fuel tank and lines will require at least a flush and clean. The owner is under the impression that with these few tasks completed, there is no reason why the car couldn’t be returned to the road fairly quickly.

I’m not 100% sure about when the interior photos of the Impala were taken, because, in the previously mentioned video, the dash has been dismantled to install the new wiring. The rest of the interior will require restoration, so we’re talking about the replacement of the majority of the upholstered surfaces, along with a new carpet set and dash pad. There is an aftermarket tach attached to the steering column, along with some gauges hanging under the dash. Otherwise, the dash itself doesn’t look like it has been cut, which is a real bonus. The original radio is missing, but sourcing a replacement is probably going to be relatively easy.

If the photos and video are to be believed, then restoring this ’66 Impala SS might be a fairly straightforward project. The killer from a financial perspective will be the cost of replacing the glass. If full retail prices are any indication, then there will be no change from $1,500. That’s why I suggested that potential buyers confirm with the owner where he can source the full set for the price that he mentions. Any time that you can potentially save a cool $1,000 on any restoration is always a real bonus. Otherwise, this SS would seem to represent a pretty affordable project car, and for someone looking to dip their toe in the water, it might be a good thing.

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Comments

  1. Fitz

    Glass, pressure wash the body, interior. Remove 327, install 427. Close hood & smile

    3
  2. Clay Bryant

    Pull out the 427, install a good 327 and you’ll always have a smile on your face.

    7
    • JOHN Member

      Pull them both and put an LS3 in it with a few tweaks. Reliability, economy, incredible aftermarket support, not to mention stupid performance. Throw a turbo or two at it and really have some fun!

  3. TimM

    Just rebuild it as it is and keep it a classic SS Impala!!!

    1
    • Mike

      I agree. I don’t get this whole “LS swap it” thing, or any of the other modern swaps into classic vehicles. Sure, if you’re a professional builder, or paying one to do it, go for it. However, for those of us building projects in our home shops, on limited budgets, I don’t see these as feasible. Have all the fun you want with modern vehicles and your unlimited budgets, but, leave the classics alone. I can’t even imagine the nightmares of wiring and hiding all of the control modules, all while trying to make it look right on a classic car or truck.

  4. Mike

    Not that I’m interested in taking on this project, but, a few minutes of internet searching revealed 2 very reasonably priced glass sets for this car. Auto City Classics lists a complete, 8 piece set for $699 and a 7 piece set (no windshield) for $589. Of course all of the weatherstripping will also need replacement.

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