Completely Original: 1967 Volkswagen Beetle

The Volkswagen Beetle is a car that has never fallen out of favor with classic car collectors, and I don’t see this situation changing at any time in the near future. This 1967 model offers the new owner a number of possibilities, and you will find it listed for sale here on eBay. It is located in Coos Bay, Oregon, and is being offered for sale with a clear title.

Rust in this Beetle is not a huge issue. The passenger side floor pan has been repaired or replaced at some stage in the past, but otherwise, there’s nothing major. There is also some minor damage to the front bumper and its mounts, but this should be easy to fix. The car has undergone a repaint in its original color at some point in its life, but the paint is now looking really tired and could do with a refresh.

The engine is believed to be the original 1,500cc 4-cylinder engine. It is said to start, run, and drive really well, and all of the attached components such as the distributor and carburetor are also believed to be original. The brakes work, but the owner says that they do need attention. Perhaps this is the reason for the front bumper damage. The car is also fitted with 2″ drop spindles on the front, and the rear height has been altered to match. It certainly gives the Beetle a more purposeful stance.

The interior has certainly seen better days, and if a complete restoration is going to be completed on the outside of the vehicle, then the interior will require the same treatment. India Red leatherette trim as fitted to this car was only available with cars finished in black during the 1967 model year, making it one of the rarer trim colors for that year. Having said that, the material is still available, so an interior re-trim should not be a problem.

I guess the new owner of this ’67 Beetle has three options available to them with this car. The first would be to get the car in a sound mechanical state and then drive it as it is. The second would be to undertake a complete restoration of the vehicle, returning it to its original state. The third option would be to modify the car to their own tastes, creating a personalized vehicle. I guess that there are a few people that can see the possibilities with this car. So far, seven people have bid on the car, but the bidding has only reached $1,125. I’d be willing to bet that there will be a bit more bidding before this auction ends.

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Comments

  1. Mountainwoodie

    Well…….not completely original……the repaint quashes that. The owner qualifies everything with the notation that …this or that part is correct for a ’67. He /She seems knowledgeable about VW’s but not about the car itself. Must have found it on the side of the road. Judging by the old yellow and blue plates it hasnt been on the road for a while. Nonetheless, if it had a sunroof I would bid. Im love the India Red interior and ’67’s in general. Hell I miss the days of $1,000.00 running and good condition VW bugs

    3
    • A.J.

      I miss those days too, Mountainwoodie. My ’68 listed brand new at $1796.00! The add on air conditioning (car was in San Antonio) added I think $1200. Driving 62MPH on the loop, when the a/c kicked on the speed dropped to 58.We bought it two years old for $1500, big money in 1970, especially when a buck sergeant in the USAF only made about $150/mo!

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      • Urquiola

        Interesting, my first salary as sergeant, Spanish Air Force, conscription army service, 1977, was 130 € a month. A Seat 127 costed 1’000 €, a 3 room 100 m2 home with garage in a mountain part of Gran Canaria, Tafira, 6’000 €. An Hotel night ‘Las Salinas’ Costa Teguise, Lanzarote, 6 €, special offer for end of year night.
        In 1988 I met in Kalamazoo, MI, a Mexican physician, angry because he needed over 2 years of income to purchase a VW ‘Käfer’. For a home, they said the appropriate amount to spend was the income from 2 years and a half. Look at the attached ad, a 6 cylinders in line 1916 Willys Overland roadster, sold in $695 (ad from ‘Ladies’ Home Journal’

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  2. ken TILLY

    Surely the double bumpers and tiny rear lights were long gone by 1967?

    • Fordfan

      ’67 is a mishmosh of parts some unique to ’67
      1968 had the new bumpers and the tombstone seats

      1
    • Mntbikerxs

      1967 was the last year for the big bumpers, and the towel bars on the rear bumper as well as the dual backup lights are one year only items. Tons of one year only parts on the 67, retractable seat belts, hood, engine lid, rear apron, wheels, front fenders, all one year and hard to find items. 67 was the first year for 12 volt system and the 1500 singleport, arguably the finest motor VW ever built. They were fine cars, drive my 67 sunroof all the time.

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  3. Urquiola

    Beautiful car!
    I’d say the right translation of German term: ‘Käfer’ -Kaefer, they use for VW people’s car, is: ‘Ladybug’, as in French: ‘Coccinelle’, ‘Beetle’ is another type of animal, not that nice.

  4. BOP_GUY Member

    We sold our 66 Beetle last year, that we had bought from the original owner (paperwork included). Only year with the 1300cc engine and a handful of other one-year-only parts. It wasn’t a convertible or ragtop, but we still got around 9 grand for it. This one looks like it could be polished up with a weekend of work on that paint. No picture of the battery box is concerning. I love saving cars like this and bringing them back to beautiful, but someone will need some bucks in their pocket to redo that interior right. I say, rebuild the engine and carburetor, fix any electrical issues and brakes, shine this baby up and drive her as she is (with seat covers!).

    3
  5. RoughDiamond Member

    I believe the ’67 Beetles also had unique outside door handles and the newly styled front fenders and headlights just added to the overall crisp styling from the previous years.

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