Depression-Era Stunner: 1932 Lincoln Victoria Coupe

Even in its current condition, this 1932 Lincoln Victoria Coupe imparts a classy presence with a side order of “Are you talkin’ to me?” attitude. This Murray-bodied five-passenger coupe is one of fewer than 200 built, and one of fewer than ten remaining. Thanks to Paul C. who spotted this lovely Lincoln located in Bozeman, Montana with a listing here on eBay. Offered as a parts car with a “Buy It Now” price of nearly $50,000, it could be restored, but after owning this car since the ’80s, the seller has become familiar with how its body and other parts interchange with other Lincolns, and the listing describes multiple use cases.

While never restored, the Depression-era luxury coupe has benefited from some preservation attempts and (at least some) indoor storage. The seller describes the car as complete except for the rear seat cushions and one of the unique green tinted glass sun visors. Aesthetically the factory design needs little more than air-bags to drop it into the weeds and different wheels and tires to become an eye-popping custom. Of course mechanically it needs a mountain of work to reach that end-point

Though not looking particularly opera-ready, this luxury coupe appears far too salvageable to be called a parts car. I’d rather see this done up as a respectable custom or an all-out high-dollar hot rod than to have its parts scavenged for other non-original projects. However anything that gets one or another classic car out of the barn and back on the road is a win.

Lincoln’s new V12 was the hot news for 1932, so much so that the V12 cars were called “KB” and the V8 cars like this one “KA.” This 384.8 cu.in. Flat Head V-8 produces 125 hp at 2900 rpm (some details from Museum-Volante.de).

Original Lincoln sales literature describes how the front passenger seat slides up when the seat-back is flipped forward, and the convenient pass-through allows access to the trunk. Sound familiar?  Considering my limited experience with 1930s classics, I’m not sure how sacrilegious it would be to harvest this body to, say, restore a V12 KB. Packards of this era never fail to get my blood pumping, but this Lincoln is a stunner that you could park next to anything and draw a crowd. What do you think of this high-rolling ’30s coupe?

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Comments

  1. Chuck

    This would look so cool,with a chopped top!!!

    • grant

      NOOOOOOO!! Don’t cut it up. This car looks fairly complete and solid. Why break it up? Suggestions such as those are why we have pitchforks, and torches!

      • Sam

        This is a very elegant car that should be restored. It gives off the vibe of being a rich bachelors ride. I saw a 30s restorod Cadillac and Packard sedan at the recent Ducktail Run in Gas City, IN…doesn’t look right.

      • Rodney

        What is the expression?
        To a hammer every problem is a nail.
        To a hot rodder every car is a custom….

    • Brian R

      NO, Stop that!

  2. CATHOUSE

    This is the same seller as the ravine find Buick woody wagon.

  3. jeff6599

    It is a beautiful car but the price guides say that a no. 3 car (typical showable driver) is valued at $36k. No one with an ounce of sense will commit to this offering. You are in a buyers market here and very very few want into this restoration.

    A 1932 Ford version is in a sellers market as they are very very sought after in the non stock builder’s world. The owner should put it on a power rotation pedestal and place a Lay Z-Boy nearby and enjoy his money’s worth, maybe a cigar and a little Black Jack and 7. His heirs will see the light a bit more clearly as they are probably not as in love with this Lincoln as they may be with other commodities.

    All the best

    • streamliner

      Bang on! Well said jeff6599. Steve Murphy and Bob Woodburn locate vehicles in Montana that people have sitting around. Then list online and sold on commission basis. Woodburn lists same vehicle on ebay, and Murphy lists on his site Desertclassics. This Lincoln is a perfect example of math that doesn’t add up. The long, folksy, seemingly enthusiastic listings may fool some, but do your own math. This Lincoln is a beautiful project car. But this is not a Duesenberg barn find. Buy this for $50,000, then sink another $75,000. – $100,000 and years of work into restoration. Once restored, you’ve spent upwards of $150,000. In today’s buyer’s market, this handsome Lincoln restored might sell for only $50,000. – $75,000. No matter what it says in the listing write-up, that’s the math, which is why this and so many other vehicles he has for sale are listed for multiple years at highly inflated prices.

  4. jeff6599

    It is a beautiful car but the price guides say that a no. 3 car (typical showable driver) is valued at $36k. No one with an ounce of sense will commit to this offering. You are in a buyers market here and very very few want into this restoration.

    A 1932 Ford version is in a sellers market as they are very very sought after in the non stock builder’s world. The owner should put it on a power rotation pedestal and place a Lay Z-Boy nearby and enjoy his money’s worth, maybe a cigar and a little Black Jack and 7. His heirs will see the light a bit more clearly as they are probably not as in love with this Lincoln as they may be with other commodities.

    All the best

    • llopdoro

      This car is for sale by Desert Classics, in Butte, MT, from long time. The owner of the company, Steve Murphy wanted $55,000.

      • streamliner

        Ilopdoro is correct. In fact, Steve Murphy and Bob Woodburn list many of the same vehicles. Have for many years. All priced very high with listings often posted for years well above market value. Murphy sells same vehicles thru Desertclassics while Woodburn lists on ebay. Woodburn’s m.o. is extremely long descriptions that come across as overly folksy. Asking prices tho are not Montana, but mid-town Manhattan. This Lincoln has been for sale at this price for a very, very long time. The market has spoken. Eh hem..
        Check on this listing for 1930 Model A Woodburn sold several years ago. Purportedly for something like $76,000. http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/280550.html?1333763156

  5. Karguy James

    The Lincoln of course mimics the iconic 1932 Ford in so many ways. This is just an overgrown 1932 Ford Vicky and it would make a killer hotrod.

  6. geomechs geomechs Member

    Restoration is the only way to go on this. When they’re this complete, you restore them and enjoy them the way they were intended. Read grant’s comments of the pitchforks and torches; add: guns and knives….

    • JimmyinTEXAS

      Don’t forget tar and feathers….lol

  7. mike D

    $50K for a PARTS CAR? hopefully it is just a bill of sale, and it is not regulated as ” scrap” ! I see lots of possibilities for this car! probably best to keep it as close to stock as possible, but , the possibilities of a custom are endless.. a MILD custom would make this car a real looker! ( nothing dramatic) hope the seller gets a bit more flexible on his price , and the new owner does it justice

  8. ccrvtt

    Cool. Very Cool. But not $50K cool…

  9. Wagon master Member

    I third that motion. $50 Gs? Ahhh come on!

  10. TriPowerVette

    There isn’t a line on it that isn’t perfect. He who parts out this magnificent paeon to the depression-era wealthy, will 1) lose his first born 2) experience a plague of locusts 3) be visited with boils all over his body and 4) lose all of his tee-times for eternity. But $50,000? Hmmm. What price perfection?

  11. GearHead Engineering

    O. M. G!!!!

    I absolutely love this car. Awesome styling, solid looking body, and a perfect blank slate to start a restoration. What a journey that would be.

    I would be thrilled to become the next caretaker. But I can’t see it being worth even half the asking price. Locally I can buy a Chrysler roadster (with rumble seat) in similar condition for less than $20k. And even that is too high compared to the cost of buying a driver level car ready to go.

    It’s too bad the owner doesn’t really want to let it go.

    – John

    Oh, FWIW I would keep it stock.

  12. Dave

    He’ll have to come down to at least 49,999 before he gets a bite /s

  13. Madmatt

    Man..This car is an art deco master piece! LOL,..ok its not a “Duesenburg”..!
    but what great styling/lines.,would be more beautiful
    if seller were much more realistic on price.
    I hope the buyer gets a better deal !,and has time and
    money…..to do this elegant beauty justice.
    I could see some– “gangsters”
    w/tommy guns on the running boards in an old black and white
    detective movie…way back when…..Lol

  14. Lee

    $50,000 and its still not an open car– obviously not as popular ,by the numbers, as the Ford Victoria and with all the missing parts and a rotted out lower area it has been used as a scavenger hunt to restore valuable Lincolns I don’t care how long it takes for him to Flip it ,this car can’t be restored with out dropping in a big deep HOLE— I don’t care how beautiful he thinks it is Way to much money

  15. MGTOMMM

    Just check on Google to see how beautiful these classics are when properly restored. WOW. Yup, $50k way silly. I could see $20k tops but that’s not an offer!

    I can’t think of too many cars that can be restored for less than the car is worth, if the restoration is honest, correct, authentic and professional. This is one of those.

  16. Lance

    This guy prices EVERYTHING he sell as high as a kite. He’s had a carcass of a bus for sale for at least a year for $6,000, He has a 52 Plymouth station wagon rusted and full of bullet holes for sale for $5,000. Somewhere somebody must be buying this stuff at his prices but they can’t be in their right minds.

    • streamliner

      Lance, you nailed Bob Woodburn / Steve Murphy / Desert Classics. ie: the school bus you wrote about was for sale for at least 1.5 years. Real world, fair market value for that was no more than 33% of asking price. Have often wondered if these vehicles actually (eventually) sell, or the real owners just take back, or just scrapped? Best way to describe this inflated price sales tactic is; “a try”. Does anyone really pay 300% over market value in 2017? There is now so much up-to-date vintage vehicle valuation info readily available online. Have to assume this must work on some people, sometime. What a shame. Speculators / flippers really spoil the hobby.

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