Drag Car Project? 1969 Plymouth Belvedere

Usually, when I find a late ’60s Plymouth Belvedere for sale it has some sort of a half-baked Road Runner/GTX vibe going on. Occasionally, I’ll encounter a nicely equipped, very stock, unmolested example but that’s a rarity. Today, for your review, we have a ’69 Plymouth Belvedere that could be best described as a project – it is neither a race car poser nor a nice survivor so let’s see what’s really here. This Mopar “B” body is located in Weiser, Idaho and is available, here on Facebook Marketplace for $2,800.

Being a two-door post sedan, this car at first blush looks like a Road Runner as that’s the initial body style upon which Plymouth’s famed muscle car was based. Closer inspection rules that out, however. I have to admit to a certain amount of wariness anytime I encounter a car that looks like it’s held together with a ratchet strap – two actually. I know this vintage of Plymouth and Dodge attract rust like a moth to a lantern but are the straps really there to hold the whole shebang together? Probably not. The seller claims that he saved this car from being parted out but it doesn’t look like there are a lot of usable parts left. The body panels are dented and rusty, same for the bumpers, but things like the glass and taillight bezels may be able to enjoy new life elsewhere. The underside should be of concern too as it’s easy to assume it has problems, but there is no word on that aspect of this saved Plymouth.

Here’s a big surprise, it’s the 145 HP, 225 CI, “slant-six” engine under the hood. Virtually every Belvedere, Satellite, Coronet, etc. that I encounter has ChryCo’s venerable 318 CI V8 doing time in the engine room, so this discovery was unexpected. A slant-six is hands-down one of the toughest automobile engines ever built but this one appears to have had its spirit undock some time ago. Salvageable? Hard to say but this car’s fate, assuming that it has a future, is probably with a V8 motor. There is a Torqueflite automatic attached to the back of the slant-six so that may be usable for a lower-powered engine (it’s probably an A-904) or could have value in the parted-out department.

As for the interior, fuggedaboutit. It’s going to need a complete redo as it’s just a mess. It’s a simple austere environment to start with and it can be completely restored but there doesn’t appear to be much of value here as she rests.

So, what to do? The seller suggests converting this Plymouth into a drag car. Restoring it as a slant-six Belvedere won’t make financial sense but I suppose it’s a possibility if that’s what the new owner has their heart set on. It’s easy to imagine this Belvedere being turned into a Road Runner/GTX styled performance car or maybe even a restomod. Or how about a pro-tourer with a new Hellephant under the hood? Or, is this Belvedere just too far gone and it’s really time to call the scrap dealer?

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Comments

  1. Benjy58

    did Mopar have a secret formula for instant rust?

    Like 6
    • Dusty Rider

      I think they dipped them in salt water at the factory. My dad’s ’66 Newport had one of the leaf springs come up through the trunk floor due to rust out.

      Like 3
      • chuck

        My 69 Cougar did that too.

        Like 2
    • Russ Ashley

      I Mopar did have a formula for instant rust they certainly shared it with GM, Ford, and most of the other manufacturers, as they all rusted pretty quickly back then.

      Like 7
      • Joseph

        Auto makers began ecoating cars in the mid 1980s.

      • BONE

        exactly !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. Joe Machado

    Location is the formula for rust.
    Does the term, RustBelt mean anything?
    We, the hottest desert to find vehicles, does not know how to spell r u s t. I had to look up that foreign word, r u s t
    All my cars are Zero rust. So, no, Mopar, or any other vehicle builder did not make this happen.
    But, why are Mopars worth more rusty than some other makes just old running cars with none? Huh?
    I did not look to see the original color of this, 6 cyl car.
    Bet, by leaving the springs, torsion bars, low performance parts, or no performance parts, and using the word, Restore, this would be a very inexpensive car to do.
    Plus, You will be the only one at a show, with a hi-performance, aaaaaahhhh, its not? Car there. It’s funny how these bring people to look at me car, and find a leaning 6.
    I ❤️ It! Great Father/Son project!

    Like 7
    • Bill Hall

      Being an Idaho car I don’t think rust is a problem? The body doesn’t look that bad. No matter it is still a project car.

      Like 1
  3. Roger Hackney

    Slant six transmission will not bolt up to a V8.

    • Russ Ashley

      Roger, A big block 727 transmission won’t bolt up to a small block V8 engine, but I think the 904 automatic that came with a slant six will bolt up to a small block V8. Going from memory here so I could be wrong..

  4. gaspumpchas

    Inexpensive car to do? I’ll have what you are drinking, Joe! Doesnt give a good look at the roof either, looks like it had a vinyl top, also the seller couldnt be bothered to pump up the tires. Enough of the naysayers- look at it and see if you want to take it on,
    MOPAR- mostly old parts and rust.
    Good luck and stay safe
    Cheers
    GPC

    Like 2
  5. Steve R

    This car makes no sense as either a race car or Pro Touring car. Competitive turn key bracket cars can be found for $10,000-15,000, often less. Anyone building a high end Pro Touring car is smart enough to spend the extra money on the best body they can find, since that’s the only part of the car that really matters.

    This is the sort of car someone that without much experience is likely to try and tackle due to the low entry point.

    Steve R

  6. Ike Onick

    The only “drag” applied to this loosely assembled pile of iron oxide should be to the recycler.

    Like 2
  7. Steve Clinton

    “Drag car” is right. Anyone who sees it will comment “What a drag.”
    And if you restore it, it’ll drag you to the poor house.

    Like 1
  8. Arthur

    This is definitely NOT a project car that can be worked on at home. Whoever buys this Belvedere will need deep pockets and access to a professional shop that specializes in tackling basket cases like this.

    • Steve Clinton

      Well, that’s a drag.

      Like 1
  9. Roger Hackney

    The only thing a slant 6 trans will fit is another slant 6.

  10. RATTLEHEAD

    give it to uncle Tony, that guy could hop up a mopar wonder bra! he’ll make it run good even with the falling power tower. UNCLE TONY FOR PREZ IN 2024

  11. Richard Martin

    Leaning tower of power can be turbo charged or super charged. Or even less, 4 barrel carbed.

    Like 2
  12. frank orzechowski

    Being a post car adds value to it. This would be a perfect project for Graveyard Carz to redo.

  13. 1st Gear

    “Drag” car, you say ? Ok,so I’m the one who’s gonna put it out here ;.
    DRAG this CAR to the crusher. Simple.

    Like 1
    • Steve Clinton

      HAHAHA! Wish I had thought of that!

  14. George Louis

    The slant six engine in this car is not the original engine it is a transplant. Engine color for 1969 is RED.

    Like 1
  15. R.Lee

    Why is this group of parts called a car.

    100 Dollar scrap yard purchase, and that is 99 dollars to much after towing.

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