Maroon Goon: 1969 Ford Mustang Mach 1

Did you know that you could walk into a Ford dealership showroom in 1969 and order a 1969 Mustang Mach 1 with a 2 barrel carburetor and 3-speed manual transmission? Well, here is a well worn example. This 1969 Mustang Mach 1 is for sale here on eBay and has been bid up to $8,400 with just less than three days in the auction. The Mustang is located in McCalla, Alabama and is definitely a project car that will need a lot of work.

I am not sure where this car spent most of its life but it wasn’t in California or Arizona. There is a rust in a number of areas and the seller discloses that there is rot in the front floor pans, driver quarter panel, hood and the rear frame rail is also toast. I am not sure if the frame rail can be patched or replaced. The car originally came with a 351 cubic inch V8 engine with a two barrel carburetor. The original engine has been replaced with a running 302 cubic inch V8 engine with Ford Boss heads and intake. The seller states that the engine runs good and the car is being sold with a useable shaker hood but no scoop.

The car comes with a Marti Report that states the car was originally equipped with a black knit vinyl bucket interior that was built in May 1969. The Mustang was originally equipped with a 3.00:1 rear gear equipped differential and a 3-speed manual transmission. As you can see, the interior is a mess but the car comes with a new dash pad and the seats can be recovered.

The 1969 Mustang Mach 1 left the factory painted candy apple red as shown in the Marti Report and evident by the paint on the floorboards. The car is now a darker maroon or cranberry color. This car has needs but it is my favorite year Mustang. I almost bought a well used running 1969 Mach 1 in high school. What do you think this one will sell for?

WANT ADS

WANTED 1974 Porsche 914 2.0” “In a barn for over 30 years.” Contact

WANTED 66 or 67 Chevrolet chevelle would like a strong big block and 4 speed Contact

WANTED 1954 Buick Skylark Looking for a car that needs restoration Contact

WANTED 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle I am seeking an original 70 chevelle 454 block and heads in good condition Contact

WANTED 1969 Pontiac GTO Looking for a project car, prefer 4 speed, or was Contact

Submit Your Want Ad

Comments

  1. Curtis

    I’ve seen cars in alot worse shape.If you fix it all up, you will have an awesome classic mustang That you have options in choices such as put another 351 in it, repaint it the original red color and just enjoy it.

    Like 5
    • Chris M.

      It’s true. This car is certainly fixable with alot of enjoyment left in it for bucks down guy.

  2. Chuck

    Two barrel carb performance car?
    This is another reason why GM cars were better than Fords. Compare a big block Camaro vs Mustang underhood. The shock towers on Mustangs resulted in the engine being crammed in, especially on big blocks. Ford engines always seemed to be randomly covered with vacuum lines and wires, too. The front distributor was nice though.

    Like 3
    • Chris M.

      Wow. It’s one thing to have brand loyalty but to make wildly random observations with no sound reasoning to support them is just plain ignorant. Lol “The shock towers on Ford’s forced the engine to be crammed in” ok? A Ford Mustang and a Chevy Camaro were both unibody cars. Fundamentally engineered exactly the same. It’s pretty tight under the hood of a 427 Yenko Nova too! You have no point with that statement. “Ford engines always seemed to be randomly hidden by vacuum lines and wires” WTF? LOL Anything built after 1974 was “hidden” as you say by smog equipment!! If you’re a GM guy that’s cool but don’t be the backward redneck GM guy with the idiotic window sticker showing the dude pissing on a blue oval emblem. Hell I’m not even a Ford guy but I do know Fords are good as any other brand of a similar era and often times better.

      Like 5
      • chuck

        Hahahahaha.
        Wrong. Camaro was built with a subframe, and there was lots more room under hood than a Mustang. I’m talking about Muscle Car era engines, genius. Hahahahaha you made a fool of yourself again. LMAO.

        Like 1
  3. Troy s

    I like the color, inside and out, the three speed tranny, basically a fan of these ’69-70 Mustangs in general, although this one here was a
    dog on a leash with that 2 pot 351 and 3.00 gearing. Does it have a Boss 302 in it now or is that just a built up…..302 “Clevor”?
    Torque Thrusts or Magnums will really bring out the aggressive looks, power can be attained in so many configurations,,, that’s what makes it all the more interesting. Neat-0h

  4. robert semrad

    I agree…..if the builder is frugal he can have it about all finished and running well for $25-30K……it would be worth at least that much if not more. Nice car….

    Like 1
  5. JoeNYWF64

    What ths sold for, would not a new dynacorn body be a better idea?
    It seems all old cars back then, regardless of manufacturer, had floors that would rust bad. Is this from salty water splashing underneath & poor floorplan finishes? Or just plain water getting INSIDE from a leaky windshield, door, or kickpanel, & never drying udner the carpet/insulation? How did they solve this problem with ’90s cars & newer. No water leaks at all on my 1991 Mitsubishi – & it’s always been outside!
    Or could it be something silly on the above car as leaving windows partially open or not using floor mats where there is a lot of rain or slush brought in by one’s feet?

    • robert semrad

      Maybe the reason the manufacturers didn’t take the effort to seal the floors, or underneath, and make them more water tight is because no one had any idea that they would become so sought after and valuable as they are today. Plus, it would have taken much more money to make them more rust proof and that would have edged them out of the price range and people would go buy a different brand who didn’t do the prep, and have cheaper cars.

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks.

Become a member to add images to your comments.

*

Keep me in the conversation via email. Or subscribe without commenting.