No Back Story: 1968 Chevrolet Corvette

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This first year C3 Corvette looks to have been off the road for a while, but appears to be a very solid ‘Vette. Sporting a 350 horsepower 327, and a 4 speed transmission, this Corvette draws our interests further into this American icon. Bidding has currently reached $8,000 with no reserve. Find it here on eBay out of Mead, Colorado.

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Looking under the hood reveals the 327 cubic inch V8 mated to a 4 speed transmission. Though missing from the photos, the seller does have an air cleaner and distributer for the 327. There is no mention of the drivetrains condition, in fact, there is little information provided with this car at all. The engine and bay look reasonable for a car that has been sitting and primered. The horns and wiring in the nose of this car have some primer overspray as well.

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Looking inside reveals a mostly complete interior, that needs some help. The console it still present, although in rough shape. The radio is missing, as well as the upper vents. The gauge cluster looks nice as do the gauges.  The door panels are there, but have some minor cracking where your elbow would rest. Basically the interior needs a good going over, and restoration. Studying this Corvettes exterior reveals a nice crack free body. Though the body has been partially primered, it would appear the original color of this Corvette is red. Both “T” tops are present and overall the exterior of this Corvette looks to be complete and in good shape. The only underside shot is of the front cross member which looks great, wearing only a fine layer of surface rust.

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Solid and mostly complete this ’68 Corvette is an excellent restoration candidate. What would you do with this C3?

 

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Comments

  1. Bill

    I had a ’68 coupe. Yellow. Beautiful car, but an electrical nightmare. This one will need a lot of work and money and will never be as desirable as a ’69.

  2. RandyS

    Never buy a C3 without a PPI or very detailed pictures of the frame kick-ups and birdcage. Can easily become financially underwater and/or an albatross project if the frame needs work.

    $8000 is the limit for this no-option car without that.

    • Jeff

      Almost exactly what I was going to type…

  3. PaulG

    Just curious, does this car come with a pre-paid VISA for say $8000.00?

  4. David Montanbeau

    This would make a great everyday street car.

  5. erikj

    Somebody said crack free body?
    I still like this, makes me miss the only vette I had which was a 68. Just let it go this summer. I know that they are not the most desirable in the collector world,but I always wanted one and although I,ve had a lot of cool stuff I got when I started buying and selling in the 70,s my 68 was the only vette I ever had and wanted .I,m tempted ,but I know better so my brain says no. Its a good one if not to bad. From experience I know that a pi should be done. Love the t-top higher hp 327 and 4sp.

  6. dogwater

    Might be a nightmare………………………….

  7. Rolf Poncho 455

    I like a corvette the shape is awesome needs a big block
    and wide wheels

  8. Philip

    Walk away. 68’s that are in ready to drive condition even have their own special set of issues, since its the first year C3. If you want a 68, find one for around 13K$ that needs paint and or interior work and maybe some driveline stuff. These are out there that don’t need much and many are 327 stick cars. Personally If it were me I’d look for a 72-73 they like many C3’s are a dime a dozen and ready to drive tinker cars can be had in nice shape all the time from 13 to 17K all day long. Or you can get a 76-82 for 4-8K$ and drop in s big block or stroker in front of the Super T-10. If you educate yourself beforehand you can find a Better for a fair price in great shape. It’s a buyers market and C3’s are still a little flat price wise for most years unless its a Convertible Big Block car wit medium and up options. Then it gets pricy..

  9. Nic Brown

    I have a 68 now, I drive it everywhere in the summer days, been from Ontario to Carlisle, Penn for the vette show. It’s been one of my better weekend cars. For the cost of it, it’s been worth every penny.
    I agree watch for the frame issues, you can google them and find out all about them, it’s easy to figure out…..I did. LOL

    Nic

    • Philip

      Frames rotting are a hot real issue on these. The are not the strongest frames to begin with, Rust can take 50-75 pounds or more out of their structure and strength yet still appear to be just “surface rust” and media blasted then painted.. One good unsuspecting buyer/owner will hook up and launch it, or after some spirited driving turn one with a weak frame into a banana or 2 separate pieces. Kick ups are known to rust badly, as do trailing arms, body mount pockets, places all over the bird cage, floor, seat belt floor mounts, the A pillar frame, and T roof frame. A bad frame and/or bird cage will ruin your day, and it happens all the time.

      On the whole, it’s cheaper still far less $$$ to swap out a frame, than a bird cage. Most people with a decent size garage can do it,.. a frame off home rotisserie restore / resto mod/rebuild at home if they read up, get lifting help from a few friends, proper planning & careful research.

      Brand new epoxy coated frames are readily available for any year C3, as is every nut, bolt,screw, line, clip and component to populate them to like new condition. Careful research and shopping will net you inexpensive parts, but you have to shop in between the high dollar places, like Ecklers and Mid America, or Corvette Central/similar.

      ‘A’ pillar rust/replacement can be handled with a Mig welder at home fairly easy as can the floors, as long as you build a proper jig to hold the shape / install the new pieces while you measure / level / plumb everything carefully, even on a ‘Vert.

      Floors are fiberglass up to ’76, then they are metal and rust easily especially if the limber holes and drains are clogged with garbage, leaves, etc, and the weather strips/top(s) leak marginally..

      Most often the frame and birdcage doom the project financially, or make it cost far more than desirable or affordable. This is where the fearful boys are separated from the men !.

      My ’81 survivor was female owned, kept a climate controlled finished garage, never driven in inclement weather. I bought it with 51,000 miles on the clock from the documented one owner. It now has 60,226 miles after 16 years of ownership by me. The paint was still on the frame and floors as well as factory undercoat. The under-body cage floors and under fastback hatch floor/gas tank areas and frame, even under the nose, front clip, & radiator support was perfect… it even had GM factory OEM corrosion protection,.. which is GM car guy’s code for an oil puking small block Chevy engine, Turbo 350-C/cooler/steering cooler, transmission & Dana 44 rear diff !!!!

      I pulled the entire drive-line front to rear & everything between, then installed a ZZ-383, 400 Turbo built by me,, and 3:73 posi. I’m going to put a TKO 6 speed with hydraulic clutch in it since these are crazy fun to drive with a close ratio stick and overdrive for economy (yea, right economy with a 750 dbl-pmpr. Street Demon on top of a 550 Hp 383). Everything under the car is stored inside and pickled, along with the computer and harness. Any future owner(s) (not likely, I probably wont sell it, but someone might need it all including exhaust from steel manifolds to tailpipes & the cat ) can have it returned to stock. It is/was an numbers matching survivor, highly optioned low build number early Bowling Green first month first year car. I think there were under 100 built of these like it.

      I know I’m stupid for taking it apart. I can easily put it back any time over a weekend or 2 and transfer the high performance drive-line to a 72-73.. Even the clutch leaves no signs, as you use the factory slave cylinder mounting hole and OEM bolt-in pedals. If your going to play, this is the way to go, it’s all 100% reversible. There is a provision in the floor for the stick shift to be installed without destroying the floor by cutting it up.

      The entire original drive-line needed to be pulled and resealed for mega big oil leaks. The cam needed replacing as well. Lack of Zinc in motor oils from the 80’s up to present day and soft-ish cams left it with 2 wiped cam lobes on 2 different cylinders.An L82 cam, or similar hydraulic muscle car cam will wake up the anemic 190 Hp L-81 computer controlled closed loop feedback CCC car car, with a little mild head work, which is the other weak point in these cars to look for valve train and leaks galore. The 2:87 gears are also easily re-installed as, it is a 3rd member type set up.
      .

      My car is an 81, blue metallic clear coat, camel leather interior, with every available option, including a block heater, AM/FM/ 8-Track/40 Channel CB. The point here is, if you start with a solid car at the lowest possible cost, you end up with an inexpensive fun to drive car, that if you want to sell, you will make you money or at least break even if you sell.

      Don’t just buy just any year or drive-line equipped Vett because it’s cheap, since a rusty or busted/disintegrating car can easily be attached to it. Vettes are not all fiberglass and can rust/disintegrate like any other car. Research yours and thoroughly inspect the car/ take hidden places apart, or use an inexpensive digital boroscope type tool. You can get into any tight place even INSIDE the frame to inspect non-invasively. Harbor Freight sells them cheap. If a person wont let you inspect it that deep, walk away. It isn’t worth getting bit.

      Currently ’75 to ’81 cars can be had from about 3K$ up, for a good condition car or for building a solid driver or resto-mod/ restoration. ’82’s are gaining in value,going up because of the high options on most of them., The Cross Fire fuel injection is desirable for a nice driver, mild modification’s, and even the rear hatch opens on these. The Collector Edition 82 if properly maintained is skyrocketing in value compared to a decade ago. Same applies to 75/6 convertibles, 78 25th anniversary editions, and pre 74 cars, especially big block 4 speed C3″s. The ’75-’81’s will be the last entry level C3’s at bargain prices. Since they are among the newest made, in theory, and most aerodynamic/solidest/quietest inside, best riding, best optioned and reliable of the C3’s. Most of the time they are the lowest mileage and best conditions overall. With A/C working, along with cruise control and rear window defrost, lighted vanity visors, these are super comfy and reliable. The fiberglass rear spring no only reduces weight but rides and handles better than multi leaf spring cars. *0-82 they shaved quite a bit of weight from other areas on an otherwise fairly tubby and under-powered C3 even with the L-82 and a stick/2.73 rear.

      My next and last Corvette will be a ’72-73 steel bumper car front and rear, or rear only for ’73. I don’t care about numbers, I want a completely rust free non rotted coupe roller with or without trans and motor. It also has to be a stick car. My plan is to build one last car before I am too old to do it or enjoy it. An all Aluminum LS supercharge motor with about 800 RWHP and highway gears that still haul with a deep geared six speed in front and behind the LS. This is the direction I am going to take, for the most power, drive-ability and every day reliability, not to mention fuel mileage, cost, light weight and other compelling factors.

      @ Nic Brown>>>

      You go to Carlisle Pa. shows, I live in Hanover Pa. and try to go every year, where are you located?

      • leiniedude leiniedude Member

        Please, never say last Corvette Philip.

  10. leiniedude leiniedude Member

    Nice seats, and what is screwed onto the console behind the e-brake handle ?

  11. Philip

    Looks like an attempt at a hand stitched arm rest pad thingie…

  12. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    The upper vent and windshield wiper controls are there. Your looking at the backside of them.

    Having been through one of these, this one is scary, but not impossible to restore and enjoy.

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