Rare Factory Snow Plow: 1971 IH Scout Sno Star Edition

This Scout might fall into the “rare does not equal valuable” category, but its cool nonetheless. This is a 1971 International Harvester Scout Sno Star edition equipped from the factory with a snow plow. This is an 800B model Scout which makes it unusual, the 800B was an interim model  between the 800A and Scout II, the 800B was built for less than a year. If you’re in the market for an unusual Scout or need a snow plow to use around the house this one might be worth a look, find it here on Craigslist in Oxford, CT with an asking price of $2,500. Thanks to Barn Finds reader Levi for the tip!

The snow plow was probably provided from the factory and installed at the dealership if I had to say. The Plow is a Meyer hydraulic operated unit, I’m sure this Scout has paid for itself many times over its life of pushing snow. The seller seems to know a lot about this truck and Scouts in general. One thing mentioned in the ad is a factory boxed frame, is this something unique to the 800B or just the Sno Star package? I could understand the designers wanting to strengthen the frame if it was intended for snow plow use.

The operating decal is still intact and mounted on the dash below the control levers. Its cool to see this decal still intact, if someone where to restore this truck I’m sure a decal like this would be impossible to find, plus it is just good information for the user. Less than 500 Scouts were built with the Sno Star package.

The levers can be seen just to the left of the steering column, the truck has an automatic transmission which is probably a good thing so the driver can keep one hand on the wheel while operating the controls, I have never driven a snow plow so maybe it’s no big deal but it sounds reasonable. The interior is worn as expected but everything seems to be there including a radio. Thats not a console between the seats, the truck runs off a boat gas can, the fuel tank is either dirty, rusted out or both.

Rust is a big issue with this thing, the floors are gone and the rust is extending up into the tailgate hinge area, but rust can be expected on an old Scout, the seller seems to think the rust is mostly on the body and the frame is not as bad. Inside the Scout has the optional rear seat in case you need to take the kids to school on snowy days. The factory hardtop is still in place, I wonder if it has ever been removed?

Under the hood is an inline six cylinder engine, the seller mentions that it is an AMC engine, so it is probably the 232CI, I think the 258CI came a little later but I am not sure, feel free to comment if you know for sure. The engine is said to run good, the Scout cannot be driven because it needs some brake work. A previous owner was a Volvo mechanic so the Scout is equipped with a Volvo radiator and Alternator, whatever works as they say. I would like to see this Scout preserved as much as possible, it could be a good truck to have around the farm to clear the road occasionally, hopefully someone will put it to good use.

Like This? Get Our Daily Email!

Comments

  1. Howard A Member

    Um, little early to be posting snowplows, don’t you think. It will happen soon enough( although, in central Co. we had maybe 3 inches of snow all last winter)
    Man, if you think this is rusty, you should see some of the Scouts in Wisconsin, what’s left of them. Someone on another site said IH never used AMC engines, and I was quick to point out, they did. I believe, being red, this is the 232. Most 258’s I’ve seen were blue. Turns out, the 232 was optional on ’65-’71 Scouts, and both the 232 and 258 were available on ’71 -’80 Scout ll’s. Not sure about the frame thing, but it could be reinforced coming from the factory as a plow, but honestly, if it didn’t rust( yeah, right) the standard frame did just fine. I can say from experience, when plowing, an automatic is the way to go, as long as you’re easy on it. Get’s mighty old, shifting and plowing. The guy I bought my motorcycle from had 4 or 5 Scouts in his woods, and all rusted so badly, not one of them was safe to drive. Great find, IH toughness and AMC power, a win-win, as far as I’m concerned.

    8
  2. Sam61

    I dig Scouts and Broncos of this era. The subject listing will fold up like an aluminum beer can if you hit a snow drift.

    5
  3. CanuckCarGuy

    In a vehicle this light I would expect on shorter passes the automatic is preferable, to maintain momentum on the push… shifting and then accelerating to regain momentum, would induce spin.

    3
  4. Matt

    I have seen much worse. Could be very cool restored. Being a collector of IH cub cadets and an overall International Harvester enthusiast of anything they made it makes me a little bias. Again if this restorable it would be very cool to be brought back to original condition and I think it could be wort a pretty penny to an IH collector.

    3
    • Mike

      Dang right !!

  5. Jack M.

    It’s hard to tell on my phone, but that looks like a 7-8ft plow blade. You think that they would have kept it to the 5-6ft range to reduce wear and tear on the trucks.

    6
    • Andrew

      Wouldn’t the plow have to be wider than the truck? Otherwise it would get stuck.

      1
  6. Shane

    All the frames were boxed. they also packed full of mud and salt… and rusted

    3
  7. Rustytech

    Looks like a pretty solid 47 year old car. Being from CT. that alone is fantastic! I’d want to do a close inspection of the lower regions, but it looks very restorable.

  8. Big Al

    I saw this IH on craigslist, looks cool, but looks like a project. 2 towns over from me. Probably worth a good penny if restored. Some rich yuppie, would love that to plow their 300 foot driveway in the Litchfield hills, well thier maintainance worker anyway, lol!

  9. Mark Seppala

    I have a 1965 Scout 80 with factory snow plow for sale…make me an offer

    1

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.