Real Deal: 1968 Dodge Charger R/T 440

When you look at a listing for a car and realize that there are 170 people watching it eagerly, then you know that you are dealing with something pretty desirable. That’s the story with this 1970 Dodge Charger R/T 440, which is listed for sale here on eBay. At the time of writing, those 170 people have seen the bidding rise to $18,750. The reserve has now been met, so you have to wonder how many of those spectators are going to dip their toe in the water in an attempt to take this one home.

The Dodge started life finished in Charger Red, and it must have really been an attention-grabber back then. Time and tin worm have taken their toll, and the next owner is going to be faced with a lot of cutting, welding, and grinding to return the Charger to its best. In this case, we’re talking about rust in most of the usual places, including most of the lower body regions, along with the floors. It isn’t clear whether there are any nasty surprises hiding under the vinyl top, but the lack of obvious bubbling gives some cause for optimism. The owner also doesn’t provide any information on the rear frame rails, as these can be prone to rust issues. As a bit of a bonus, the owner is an AMD dealer and is offering a decent discount to the buyer on any of the required repair pieces to get the project up and moving. I guess that this is one way to generate business.

If you’re expecting to open the hood of the Charger and spy a 440ci V8, then you probably won’t be disappointed. However, you may be disappointed to learn that the engine isn’t original. Then again, neither is the 4-speed manual transmission…or the 4.10 Dana 60 rear end. The original 440 disappeared at some point in the past, and the current engine is of 1970-vintage. Similarly, the original 3-speed TorqueFlite transmission has made way at some point for the 4-speed. Still, it isn’t all bad news, because the 440 fires up, and the car does move under its own power. Of course, a lack of brakes makes stopping a whole other story, but at least there should be no worries about getting the Charger onto a trailer to cart it away. The car also comes with its original tags and an original Broadcast Sheet.

The interior of the Charger is an interesting proposition because apart from the tach that is mounted on the steering column, it’s very original. If the next owner replaced the armrests on the doors, the covers on the front seats, and threw in a new carpet set, it would actually present quite well. The only thing that I’m not sure about is the state of the headliner, but the rest of it looks pretty encouraging. In addition, the replacement transmission means that there is a nice Hurst shifter now poking through the floor, and the owner says that all of the gauges work as they should. One interesting option that the original owner chose to equip the Charger with is cruise control, and the switch and all of the hardware for this is still in place.

I close my eyes and have no trouble picturing this Charger R/T 440 fully restored, and that vision is pretty nice. There is a long road to be traveled between now and then, but the end result would seem to be worth the effort. There is going to be a lot of metalwork required to whip the body into shape, but the option of sourcing these parts at a reasonable rate is pretty tempting. At the end of the day, even pristine examples of the R/T 440 that are not sporting their original engine can easily pull prices in excess of $55,000. From there, $70,000 or more is not out of the question. So, are you going to join the 170 people who are watching this one, or are you going to join the 14 individuals who have actually submitted a bid?

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Jay E.

    What about the giant hole under the vinyl top on the LH sail panel? Does that count as obvious bubbling? (grin). Crazy what rusty Mopars are going for.

    4
    • Grandpa Lou

      They are going for a lot, but for how long? I can see all kinds of scenarios where the bottom drops out of the market. Are people buying these to own and love or to flip?

      1
    • MIKE KIEFFER

      Yea makes me really glad that I am not a mopar guy. It is comical what people pay for them. just to find that the parts to fix them cost twice as much as well.

      1
      • Dave

        Actually, what you can’t get from Year One you can get from Summit Racing.

        Minor things…the car is a 1968 from the photos. Blue 440 would be a meager 350 ponies, not the 375 of a red painted motor. Easily fixed while doing the bodywork and interior.

        But since it’s never going to be numbers matching, the possibilities open up to the limits of your wallet.

        1
      • Superdessucke

        You have to be careful about reproduction parts. A lot of that stuff comes from China now and it’s kind of hard to determine that before buying it.

        Just try calling up Year One or Summit and asking them where a part’s made, LOL! You will be on the phone 15 minutes for each part, and probably get a straight answer about 20% of the time.

        That’s why if I was going to buy one of these, I would make sure it was all original with a little patina. When this thing is done, it will be about as American as a Geeley.

  2. Christopher

    In 68 the 440 Magnums were blue and rated at 375hp. The color change to grange happened in 69.

    1
  3. mainlymuscle

    Nice timing,though there seems to be a ratty 68 Charger here every week.
    I answered a local ad last Thursday,pulled a 68 out of the garage it had been in since 1975 on Saturday,in a snowstorm.$10k Canadian ($7500 U.S. ).Very good bones ,perfect interior,excellent chrome.Basic 318 ,Column shift car.My best economic move ? Flip it ,and triple my money.Not going to happen.
    I’m going to drive it,as is,for a year.When was the last time you saw a ratty white Charger ?Future plans may involve the new Mopar 1000 hp crate motor,and the triple Black that looks so mean on these.Either way,my garage find is a “long term hold ” for me.A GM guy at heart,the 68 Charger is the quintessential musclecar to me,with honourable mention to 1970 Chevelle,and 70/71 Cuda,both of which I already have.

    5
    • Dave

      In that respect, I bought a ratty Browning Golden Eagle Mark 3 CB radio at a hamfest a few weeks ago.
      Between 1972 and 1977 they were the best, selling for between $495 and $650.
      To your point, they go for ridiculous money online. I got mine for a fair price, fixed the problems it had, and have no plans to flip it even though the rare AM only transmitter doesn’t have a cover.

      Buy it. Fix it. Use it. More power to you!

      1
  4. Del

    After a peek at this I would say, stay away. Far away

    • Dave

      Why? It all depends on how much money and time you can invest to return something you don’t see everyday to service?

      It doesn’t matter if it’s this car or the Model T roadster a few cars back. Buy what you like, fix it up, and enjoy the fruits of your skills and craftsmanship.

      3
  5. Joe Machado

    Why do Chevy-Ford people paint Mopar engine bays black?

    2
  6. mk

    he ant a ford or chevy guy if he has a mopar

    1
  7. JohnfromSC

    My personal fantasy is to buy a 68, go modest resto with incredible black paint aka Bullitt, then find a 68 Mustang fastback, make it into a Bullitt clone and enjoy both halves of the equation!

    2
  8. stillrunners stillrunners Member

    All about production numbers, demand or desirability, survival rate (not to mention a certain TV show ) and what sells across the world.

  9. TimM

    Well at least it runs and drives!!!

  10. Boatman Member

    This is about the 3rd 60’s Mopar I’ve seen on here recently with electronic ignition conversion, but the writer(s) don’t mention it. Don’t know what it is?

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.