Rust Free 1973 Mustang Grande Barn Find!

After rescuing this 1973 Ford Mustang Grande last year, the seller was able to get it running by replacing some parts.  At this point, they are unable to complete the work and therefore have it listed for sale here on craigslist in New London, Connecticut. Thanks to Barn Finds reader FordGuy72 for sending us this great find — the seller is only asking $2,000 for the car and it’s said to be rust free!

The Grande was not looking very grand in the “as found” picture at the top of the post. The car had been stored since 1991 but thankfully was undercover. We aren’t told why the car was taken off of the road in the first place, but after the work the seller has completed they feel it still needs brakes and cleaning to be roadworthy. I’d add new tires to that list based on what I see here.

Just because the body is “rust free” (and I’m using quotes because as we have discussed many times before, one person’s definition of that does not necessarily match another person’s) doesn’t mean you won’t have bodywork to do.

Despite it’s size, the 1973 Mustang was the last model that could trace some of its mechanical origins to the original 1964/5/6 models. In the era of the Arab oil crisis and the early attempts at controlling emissions, the car was considered overweight and too large by many — this was the longest Mustang produced at 189-1/2″ (even longer than current Mustangs). The Grande sub-model had been created in 1969 to try to combine the sporty pony car features with some more luxury — so of course it got a vinyl top. As far as I can tell, the Grande also got a softer ride than the base Mustang and some additional sound deadening.

The Grande models also got some fake woodgrain panels in the interior, which you can see in this picture. Luckily, a lot of Mustang reproduction parts are available, although trying to match the original/faded green in this interior might be a challenge. Looking at the interior that’s not the only challenge you will have! The classic Mustang t-handle tells us it has an automatic transmission, which was true for more than 90% of the 1973 models sold. Interestingly enough, almost 10,000 more 1973 models were sold (135,000) than the almost identical 1972 models. However, Ford had done the right thing for the company by preparing the much smaller Mustang II for 1974, when 386,000 of them sold!

The seller has replaced the starter, alternator, fuel pump, radiator and battery cables. They have also rebuilt the carburetor and the engine runs well. Ultimately the question comes down to you — is it a grand idea to buy and refurbish this Mustang, or is it not worth two grand of your money? Let us know your thoughts in the comments!

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Comments

  1. RedBaran

    The Jolly Green Giant called – he wants his car back!

    6
  2. Chillywind

    That is a great price for this car, worth every penny. I wouldn’t doubt someone will buy and flip this one.
    If it was closer I would buy it and have some fun for a a couple months driving it then pass it on to the next timekeeper for what I had in it.

    12
  3. Audifan

    The definition of “rust-free” is totally different for people living in CA, AZ, NV, NM, OR and WA. I wouldn’t use this term on this Mustang

    9
  4. Chebby Member

    A good flip indeed, some matching wheels and a detail and the seller could double his price at least.

    5
  5. bobhess Member

    With it running it’s well worth the money and the buyer could have some fun with it. Drive it, restore it, either way a good buy.

    5
  6. Bob_in_TN Member

    Love the period-correct Bright Green Gold Metallic with Avocado interior.

    I pulled up the paint chip chart for 1973 Mustangs. Assuming what I found is correct, comparing to today’s paint choices for cars is fascinating. In 1973 you could get white, and one (just one) silver/gray. But not black. But you could get a wide variety of golds, greens, browns, and blues.

    Wonder if folks in 2059 will look at our new car color choices and remark “how boring.”

    8
    • theGasHole

      I miss those days, as we are now in awash in black, black, black, silver, and white.

      3
  7. grant

    A reasonable seller with a reasonable price? Pinch me. I love this, but 2000 is a deal breaker. Not the price, but the miles from here to there.

    6
    • theGasHole

      It’s not as bad as you think Grant. I regularly have cars and trucks transported from Washington State to New Jersey, and it’s about $1200. At the seller’s price on this Mustang, you’re still ahead of the game.

      1
  8. 38ChevyCoupeGuy

    Exactly how many babies did take to produce the dye for the interior of these? I’m with a few of the other readers,put some tires and matching wheels on it, increase the profit.Unless of course sellers thoughts are they will break even with the work already done, transport, washing it. Different strokes for different folks.

    2
  9. Little_Cars Little_Cars Member

    Jeez, pick some fresh rolling stock for this car instead of leaving the odd wheels (and what appears to be a white spoke truck wheel) to up the visual appeal of this Grande. Currently….Fugly.

    1
  10. Del

    Ford Bloat. At Ford they could not resist bloating their cars.

    Same thing happened to Cougar.

    Some uglies

    1
  11. stillrunners stillrunners Member

    Like the price…..

    1
  12. TimM

    Price is good but not the most desirable mustang!! In fact by this time in the evolution of the mustang it seemed to me it was all going downhill!!! Just my opinion!!!

    1
  13. Bob McK Member

    Must have sold. Posting was deleted. Someone a good deal. Rust free? I think not.

    2

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