Sort of Restored: 1968 AMC Javelin SST

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As a rule of thumb, we hesitate from posting restored cars here on Barn Finds, but this 1968 AMC Javelin SST doesn’t quite qualify as it’s still tired in some areas. While the interior has been completely redone and a lot of work under-hood has taken place, the suspension is still tired, the tires are shot, and the seller concedes it could use a paint job. Find it here on craigslist for $9,500, and thanks to Barn Finds reader Ikey H. for the find. 

The seller notes several big mechanical tasks have been tackled, including the following: rebuilt power steering pump; new brake booster,  master cylinder, fuel pump, battery, belts, hoses, electronic distributor, carburetor and more.  The transmission has been rebuilt, and fresh U-joints have been installed. Inside, drivers will find new door latches and the locks restored. The interior/exterior handles have also been fixed and are working. That’s an impressive list of jobs already done for the next owner.

The interior is the other big highlight, which also features new carpet and headliner. The seller notes that some bigger items still need to be done, including the need for new brakes, tires, mufflers, and weather-stripping. The suspension hasn’t been touched, either, so new shocks/struts and various bits like sway bar links may need replacement. It’s an interesting point to sell a project at, since it wouldn’t take much more to call it a turnkey car. The paint looks fine to me as-is, and I’m sure others would agree.

Of course, if you’re looking for more of project to sink your teeth into, we recently featured an AMC Javelin SST with the 343 V8. It was listed as a part of the large Georgia collection we’re helping to sell off as an Exclusive listing here on Barn Finds , so be sure to click that link if you want to check out the Javelin or any number of other project cars and trucks up for grabs.

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Comments

  1. KevinLee

    It’s had at least one respray. There’s overspray on the rear leaf springs and shackles
    Great looking car, and a perfect drive – while restoring project.

    Like 5
    • Dave

      I wholeheartedly concur. We just don’t see very many Javelins out there.

      Like 7
  2. That AMC Guy

    Nice looking Javelin! Bear in mind that rebuilding the front suspension on a ’68 Javelin means dealing with trunnions (Satan’s idea of ball joints, used on the upper control arms) as well as unobtainium strut rod bushings. Both issues can be dealt with but it’s definitely different than working on a typical “Big 3” twin ball joint setup. Most of today’s mechanics will run away screaming in terror. :)

    Like 10
    • Tirefriar

      I wonder if there are aftermarket alternatives to the stock suspension. I always felt that the first generation Javelins were proportional and very nicely styled. You would not mistake them for anything else on the road.

      This is a very good alternative for anyone looking for a project-ish car. A lot of heavy lifting is done, colors are right to my eye. Important aspect is that the new owner can customize this car to suit his/her own tastes without feeling guilty about ruining an original example….

      Like 4
    • half cab

      I agree! friend of mine has a ’68 SST and has had it for 45 yrs n the front end was a mess. He put a 390 intercepter motor in it and it really sit down on him. Would tote the mail though.

      Like 1
  3. Retired Stig

    Polyurethane strut rod bushings are easily obtained, and several AMC resto dealers sell rebuilt trunnions on exchange.
    Great looking cars, every bit as handsome as the competitors.

    Like 3
    • That AMC Guy

      The poly strut rod bushings are quite harsh over bumps. Bear in mind the design of the lower control arm depends on the strut rod bushing permitting deflection, along with twisting of the lower control arm. (I’ve seen that described as “monkey motion”.)

      One solution I’ve seen is to use one side poly, the other side rubber. The following is for pre-1965 which actually use a one-piece bushing that is double-unobtainium, but the same thing should work for 1965-1969 AMC:

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Strut-bushing/index.html

      As you indicate specialty AMC vendors can provide replacement parts for the trunnion suspension, it is just different to work on than what you find on a similar vintage Chevy, etc. Here’s a great rundown on the trunnion setup on the same site as above, though once again it’s for AMC models a few years earlier. Basics will be the same through 1969 though:

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Front-suspension/

      The AMC forum is a good resource:

      http://theamcforum.com/forum/forums.html

      A factory shop manual is also a must.

      Like 3
    • That AMC Guy

      The problem with going full poly on the strut rod bushings is that it tends to be harsh and noisy. Also the lower control arm depends on deformation of the rubber bushing in its operation. A possibility for replacement I’ve seen is a poly/rubber hybrid. This is detailed for 1963-1964 here, but the idea should be applicable through 1969 (the main difference is a 1-piece bushing was used prior to 1965):

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Strut-bushing/index.html

      As you mention parts for the trunnion suspension are available from AMC specialty vendors, it’s just different than what people used to wrenching on ball joints are used to. Here is a detailed rundown of how the trunnion suspension works, once again focusing on earlier models but the basics will be the same:

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Front-suspension/index.html

      You’d of course want a factory shop manual for your car to get all the details right. The AMC forum is also a great resource.

      http://theamcforum.com/forum/forums.html

      Like 2
    • That AMC Guy

      The problem with going full poly on the strut rod bushings is that it tends to be harsh and noisy. Also the lower control arm depends on deformation of the rubber bushing in its operation. A possibility for replacement I’ve seen is a poly/rubber hybrid. This is detailed for 1963-1964 here, but the idea should be applicable through 1969 (the main difference is a 1-piece bushing was used prior to 1965):

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Strut-bushing/index.html

      Like 3
    • That AMC Guy

      Also, as you mention parts for the trunnion suspension are available from AMC specialty vendors, it’s just different than what people used to wrenching on ball joints are used to. Here is a detailed rundown of how the trunnion suspension works, once again focusing on earlier models but the basics will be the same:

      http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Front-suspension/index.html

      You’d of course want a factory shop manual for your car to get all the details right. The AMC forum is also a great resource.

      http://theamcforum.com/forum/forums.html

      Like 3
  4. That AMC Guy

    The problem with going full poly on the strut rod bushings is that it tends to be harsh and noisy. Also the lower control arm depends on deformation of the rubber bushing in its operation. A possibility for replacement I’ve seen is a poly/rubber hybrid. This is detailed for 1963-1964 here, but the idea should be applicable through 1969 (the main difference is a 1-piece bushing was used prior to 1965):

    http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Strut-bushing/index.html

    As you mention parts for the trunnion suspension are available from AMC specialty vendors, it’s just different than what people used to wrenching on ball joints are used to. Here is a detailed rundown of how the trunnion suspension works, once again focusing on earlier models but the basics will be the same:

    http://worldpowersystems.com/AMC/Front-suspension/index.html

    You’d of course want a factory shop manual for your car to get all the details right. The AMC forum is also a great resource.

    http://theamcforum.com/forum/forums.html

    Like 0
  5. Doug B

    I think there’s a pretty good reason why this car is for sale. Black hole. Look at everything he’s done and everything that needs to be done. So he bailed. You better want a Javelin pretty bad to get that far upside down into it. My additional two cents that upholstery is ugly as sin.

    Like 2
  6. Gay Car Nut

    Lovely looking Javelin SST. I’ve always loved the 1968-69 Javelin SST.

    Like 1
  7. That AMC Guy

    Oops, sorry about the multiple postings re strut rod bushings and trunnions! The first couple of times I tried it appeared not to go through, looks like those first attempts finally appeared. D’oh! (Moderator, please feel free to delete the duplicates!)

    Like 0
    • Tirefriar

      Thats alright brother, you can’t have too much good info. Repeating it just means we’ll remember it better ;-))

      Like 4
  8. Lawrence Robert Speck

    “hey javelin want to drag/”

    Like 1

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