Stored for 40 Years: 1957 Plymouth Fury

I’m so glad that this Plymouth Fury is a 1957 model. That means that we can now avoid referring to a certain red Fury out of a certain movie, as that car was a ’58 model. This Fury has spent the last 40 years in storage and was brought out into the daylight in May of this year. It is now being offered for sale, and you will find it listed here on eBay. It is located in East Earl, Pennsylvania, and comes with a clear title. It probably is no surprise to learn that bidding on the Fury has been very spirited. After opening at $200, bidding has rocketed to $35,100, and the reserve hasn’t been met.

The storage conditions for the Fury must have been close to perfect. After pulling the car out into the light, the cleaning consisted of a wash and wax, and giving the windows a clean. The body and trim are close to perfect. There is one small spot of corrosion above each headlight, but these were touched up with a fine brush before the car went into storage, and they haven’t deteriorated any further. There are also some shots of the underside of the car, and the floors and frame look extremely good. The owner also holds a significant amount of documentation which traces the car’s history right back to the day that it left the showroom.

Attention to detail when the car was placed into storage is paying dividends now. When the car was stored, all of the windows were wound up tight, and covers were put over the seats and carpet. When the covers were removed, all that was needed was a light vacuum and clean the windows and it was returned to its current state. The seats look good, as does the carpet and door trims. The headliner has also survived well. The car is also fitted with power windows, and these work perfectly.

The dash is complete and looks really good. The pad is slightly warped, but it isn’t too bad. Looking at the dash, how can you not love an old car with a speedometer that reads to 150mph? This was no idle boast, as the ’57 Fury was officially measured traveling at 124mph, and it was believed that it still had more to give. I also like the badge in the center of the wheel reminding you that you have power steering.

Standard fare for the ’57 Fury was the 318ci V8 engine, fitted with dual 4-barrel carburetors. This combination provides a healthy 290hp to get the car moving. The car is also fitted with a TorqueFlite transmission, with the usual pushbutton operation on the dash. As previously mentioned, the Fury is fitted with power steering, and also power brakes. The brakes were among the items to receive attention when the car was revived. The car received a new master cylinder, wheel cylinders, brake shoes, and brake fluid. The gas tank was drained, and the whole fuel system was flushed. All of the remaining fluids were flushed and replaced, and when a new battery was fitted, the car started immediately and ran smoothly. The owner says that the car drives smoothly, with no engine smoke. The transmission shifts smoothly, and there are no squeaks or rattles in the car.

I guess this is one of those situations that we all dream about. Finding a car that has been stored well, and takes relatively little work to revive, even after 40 years. This is a nice survivor Fury, and these are an extraordinarily popular car in the marketplace. Nice survivors don’t come along terribly often, with the majority of examples that hit the market having undergone at least a partial restoration. When they come on the market, they also tend to sell quickly. If you can find a nice original car in this condition, you really need to be prepared to part with the best part of $70,000. The fact that the owner holds a significant amount of documentation further cements that value.

Comments

  1. leiniedude leiniedude Member

    Killer of a car! Wow! I did not realize the 318 went that far back, and with the dual 4-barrel carbs. Hard for me to believe that setup was a standard feature on the Fury. I wonder if there was an optional motor with less horses for grampa? I love this rig, glad she is not red. Great find Adam.

    Like 13
    • Howard A Member

      Hi Mike, I read, this was the standard setup for the Fury in ’57. It only had this motor and came in this color. Gramps probably would have gone with the Belvedere. Someone knew this car was worth saving. I also read, these had dismal build quality ( doors popping open and trucks that wouldn’t close). Still a sweet car, but 2-4 barrels? One on my GMC is bad enough,,,

      Like 8
      • leiniedude leiniedude Member

        Thanks Howard! Lol on the Jimmy carb! To bad on the Chevy plants closing. It really hit hard in my hometown, Janesville. From the vendors to the people that brought the clean rugs for the front doors. Trickle down effect. Sad day for a ton of families. Take care Buddy, I am counting what little blessings I have left. As a side bar, snowing here now. LOL! Mike.

        Like 2
    • BrianR

      That 318 is a polyspherical head “A” engine not the more modern 318 LA small block.

      Like 9
    • Fordfan

      Not the same 318 that’s polly 318 1967 and up was a wedge 318

      Like 6
    • Ed Tilley

      That is a big block engine, not the 318 you are thinking of.

  2. canadainmarkseh

    What a beauty, I can’t help wonder about how these were priced compared to the top of the line chevy belair when new. I’m not to sure I could run this car to often with today’s gas prices, can you imagine how fast those to two 4v carbs suck gas, talk about being over carberatorated this is it. If I had this car I’d pull that manifold and switch it for a single 4v just to slow that flow. This would be a nice change to see at the car shows next to the rows of Chevies. Nice find.

    Like 7
    • Fred W

      I suspect gas mileage won’t matter as this will be trailered to shows- those two quads aren’t going anywhere. Re: the bad build quality, that varied depending on the day of the week, this one must have been built on Wednesday!

      Like 7
      • canadainmarkseh

        Hi Fred I guess I wasn’t clear on the fact that even if I went to a one carb manifold I’d still keep this one with the car for the eventual next owner to put back on should he want to.

        Like 1
    • Glenn Radford

      You can save a lot of gas when running a dual quad setup by keeping your foot away from the firewall…

      Like 1
    • triumph1954

      Todays gas prices? I’am amazed that people look at a site like BarnFinds about old cars etc. and then complain about gas prices. I have been driving since 1970 and people were complaining about gas prices then , .35cents to .50 cents. Boohoo! Can’t this site be enjoyed without all the complaining all the time.

      Like 12
      • leiniedude leiniedude Member

        LOL! I’m with ya triumph1954.

        Like 1
      • MLM

        LOL! I’m right with you because if you can’t afford the gas,then you might need to leave it alone.

        Like 1
    • Jim Kirkland

      If you read the specs on this 318,
      marketed as the V-800, you’ll see
      it was set-up for high RPM. So the
      double carbs got a fairly decent
      workout.

      Like 1
    • Steve

      Im with you i get tired of all the Chevy’s and the simple minded 350 in everything

      Like 1
  3. jw454

    Nothing like a cool movie to boost the value of a previously obscure car model. I’d try to keep this one as close to stock as I could. Very nice.
    I wish someone would make a cool movie featuring a 1995 F150. LOL

    Like 6
    • cyclemikey

      Say what? The ’57 Fury was hardly obscure in collector circles. And I seriously doubt that the people willing to pay high five figures for this car are the same crowd as fans of a movie aimed at 14-year-old boys.

      Like 3
  4. Too Late

    Didn’t someone bury one these in a time capsule 1957 and hired Boyd to come start it it up after it was “unearthed” in 2007 ?

    Like 5
    • Mikestuff

      Hard to believe it’s been 10 years+ since “Miss Belvedere” was brought out of her tomb. I followed that online for what seems like days (and yes, I have no life)

      https://axleaddict.com/cars/MissBelvedere

      There’s lots of different links online.

      Like 4
      • dweezilaz

        I left work early to see the internet broadcast, Mike.

        Like 2
    • Scott Tait

      I think the one Boyd Coddington started was a 57 Belvedere don’t quote me on that though can’t remember

      Like 2
      • geomechs geomechs Member

        Boyd Coddington was in Tulsa when they lifted Miss Belvedere out of the ‘tomb.’ He spoke a couple of times but I was sort of oblivious to him. All I could focus on was the horrible condition the car was in…

        Like 3
      • Ed P

        The paint was holding Miss Belvedere together.

        Like 2
  5. Uncle Bob

    Lots of cars claim desirable features like “rare”, or very good condition, or “low mileage”, and so on, but this one actually delivers. This was a special car when new, and the bidding shows it’s held in high esteem even in a gradually slowing market segment. If you doubt the unique nature of this car when new just look at that invoice……………near $4k in ’57 dollars……..strong money for one of the “low priced three”.

    As for the quality issues these did suffer. Good news for this one is that it was a build from the latter part of the model year. That filler panel under the front bumper has the extra bar in each of the ovals, the earlier production ones didn’t have that.

    The seller must be a very accomplished hunter of neat ol’ car stuff as well. Most of the other items they’re selling (over 1,000) are NOS pieces, some of them pretty nifty. One of the best BF features in a while.

    Like 6
  6. Jay E.

    My family has a lot of stories that took place in their 1956 Fury. One involved driving across the Nevada desert at over 120 when my Mom awoke from a nap to the sound of a roaring dual quad engine at full song. Dad like the loud pedal, Mom, not so much. Their 1956 was a great car that they wish they still had. My parents still hate the 57 as it broke on the way home from the dealership, (it lost its brakes as the lines had not been secured correctly), never got much better and it was gone within a year.

    Like 2
  7. Ben T. Spanner

    My father bought a new 1958 Belvedere convertible with a 318 2bbl. The build quality was not bad and much better than his 1960 Dodge Dart convertible.
    In 1965 or so. my friend’s uncle died and his 17 or 18 year old cousin had to get an after school job. He needed a car and picked a 1957 Fury. It was totally hammered, with a very poor purple paint job, an a trunk floor made of screening, tar and newspaper. The rear carb had no guts, and was stuffed with a red shop rag.
    His mom raised hell and the used car lot replaced it with a pea green 1959 ford Fordor. The Ford wasn’t cool, but it ran ok.

    Like 3
  8. Vance

    True Stephen King aficionados realize that that two door 1958 Fury was not the correct car either. The car used in the book in was actually a four door Fury, which I believe wasn’t available until 1959.

    Like 2
    • dweezilaz

      He also mentions a “shift lever” as well. No reference to the buttons.

      Like 2
  9. John C

    And they say that Detroit didnt make anything that could hang in the Louvre.

    Like 5
  10. glen

    It’s a good ad. A couple more pics underneath would be nice, but a good ad.” We will require payment…”, sounds better than “must” or something similar, it may be trivial to some, but nothing wrong with being polite/respectful. Wow, I like this car! The cars from the 50’s and early 60’s have style that new cars don’t have.

    Like 4
  11. Robert Rossi

    I’m wondering why such a nice original example would have 1958 hubcaps on it. I’d love to own this!!!!

    Like 1
    • Robert Rossi

      After looking at this further I’m wondering they only put these caps on the Fury Gold package. The ’58’s had a black notch around the outer center…….

      Like 1
    • Jim

      The hubs are correct.. These caps were better to look at than the 1958s, – in my opinion. It brings back fond memories and kudo’s to the folks who own her, or will.. Personally, I would have kept this one under wraps and brought it to shows only. Best of luck to the lucky folks who buy her. Thx for the nice showing!

  12. Abarthbill

    We bought my mother a 1957 Fury new from the Plymouth dealer on Waukesha Wisconsin. Very few problems except rust over the headlights and rockers.
    I won a number of drag races with that car. Fastest car in town for a while.
    Blew a headgasket at 60K and it was gone. Wheel covers look correct to me.
    Next car for mom was a 1964 Pontiac GTO!

    Like 7
  13. ACZ

    This is absolutely beautiful!!
    (but I’d rather have a 57 Roadmaster – just personal preference)

    Like 2
  14. Pete Phillips

    Pulling the two quads and replacing them with one carburetor to slow the fuel flow (as was suggested by one of the posts above), and you’ve just thrown out about 50% of the value of this car. You don’t buy one of these for economy, for crying out loud! If you want that, go get yourself a Plymouth Savoy with a flathead six.
    Pulling off one of the carbs would be like buying a ’63 spilt window Corvette and then replacing the split window with a single window…!

    Like 11
    • Srt8

      Also, going from a 2×4 setup to a single will not decrease fuel consumption if the car is properly tuned and the single setup properly sized/jetted. The engine will consume the fuel it needs to operate regardless of the # fuel discharge devices. There’s hungry mouth’s to feed under there.

      Like 2
      • geomechs geomechs Member

        You know, that’s something I’ve tried to tell my customers for over 40 years. Back in the 70s, with the lean mixtures and retarded ignition curves, my customers would complain about rotten mileage–which they were right. They would insist on smaller jets but I would open the carburetors up, and give the advance curves a decent setup and the mileage ALWAYS came up–unless the driver was so happy with the performance he couldn’t keep his foot out of the radiator…

        Like 2
  15. Pat Gill

    Hmmmm, a couple of cars ago someone was calling the nice looking BMW 635 eurotrash and now we are hearing about 1957 Chevy build quality, next it will be about how bad Lucas electrics are, EVERY car maker builds a poor car or range of cars from time to time, the worst BMW model I had to work on in recent years was the X5 E53, and where was that made? poor build quality, very expensive parts in the UK and many short life components like differentials, heater resistors, radiator fans, door handle mechanisms, does it count as eurotrash if it is made in the USA????

    Like 3
    • mlm

      That was my point exactly Pat Gill to a certain person who seem to lack the understanding that EVERY car maker like you said builds a poor car at one time or another.

      Like 2
  16. Doug Braik

    BEAUTIFUL !!! My Dad sold these back in the day.

    Like 1
  17. Tort Member

    Beautiful car but seems pricey and the reserve isn’t met but saying that I’m sure there are very few in this condition. My older brother bought 59 Savoy?? 2dr. HT 318 auto in around 62. He let me drive it a few times and still remember how well it drove. The hubcaps on his were the same style without the small indentations around the outside. Maybe wrong year or came on more expensive models like this one?

    Like 1
    • Robert Rossi

      That’s what I was thinking about the hubcaps. Actually, in my post I said that it had ’58 caps on it…… I meant ’59. The ’59’s were the same as the ’57’s but had the notches around the outer edge. ’58’s were totally different.

      Like 1
  18. Henryfrederick

    These are nice driving cars and the gas mileage not as bad as you think. I put a bunch of miles on mine this past summer with no problems. There is an identical 57 in my area, I thought that might be the car, the elderly original owners still have it as far as I know.

    Like 3
  19. Henryfrederick

    Oh my another red one.

    Like 8
    • Eric_13cars Eric_10cars Member

      That’s a 58, isn’t it? Quad headlights and the chrome under the center of the front bumper are the clues. Fin treatment was different too. At least they didn’t ruin the look as Ford did between the 57 and 58 models.

      I remember that Hot Rod magazine did a minor customization piece on the under bumper area of the 1957 Fury. I’m trying to recall what they did, but it had to do with removing the chrome strips, painting the metal a darker color and then reinstalling the chrome so that it was highlighted. Anyone remember that?

      Like 1
      • Richard M Gaskill

        Those aren’t quad headlights. Quad headlights had four 5 3/4 ” lights. The inner lights on this car are parking lights that are smaller than the headlights. A system of four round lamps, rather than two, one high/low and one high-beam 5 3⁄4 in (146 mm) sealed beam on each side of the vehicle, introduced in 1957 by Cadillac, Imperial, Chrysler, DeSoto, Mercury, and Nash on some of their car models in states that permitted the new system.

      • Eric_13cars Eric_10cars Member

        I beg to differ, Richard. Look at the feature car and the parking lights on it versus the inner lights on this red car. They are distinctly different. The parking lights had a smaller center with some sort of trim around them. The red car’s inner lights are identical to the low beams that are turned on for the photo.

        Like 2
      • Richard M Gaskill

        My apologies. I thought you were saying the white Fury was a ’58. Now I understand you were referring to the red one.

        Like 1
    • Gay Car Nut

      That you, Christine? :)

    • Car Nut Tacoma

      This was my favourite car. This has a different grille under the front bumper. It’s not that the 57 Fury was a bad looking car overall, but with the horizontal grille underneath the front bumper, I’ve always found the 1958 Fury, Belvedere, Savoy front end the best looking.

  20. Del

    OMG !

    My ultimate dream car.

    Price sky rocketing as it should.

    The most Amazing car that I have ever seen on Barn Finds 😍😘

    Like 7
  21. Maestro1

    Yes, indeed, one of the sexiest cars out there in its day. Absolutely a buy if the price doesn’t get out of line.

    Like 1
  22. Steve1

    Its an old poly engine referring to the head design. Its been called a wide block or even a semi hemi.
    In 1967 this engine was replaced with the small block 318, a completely different engine.

    Like 1
  23. Tort Member

    In my seventy one years I have had many Tri-five Chevy’s and just completed restoration of a 55 2dr. Sedan but none unless with updated suspension compared to my brother’s 57 Plymouth in it’s ride and handling.

    Like 3
  24. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    My father had a ’57 Fury back in the day. I’ve never really sat down and talked to him about it. I better do it soon, he’s getting old.

    He had a Volvo PV544 by the time I came around.

    Like 2
  25. JimZ Member

    Current ebay price at $41k, reserve still not met.
    A beauty I’d love to own, but pocketbook sez ‘nope’.
    Sigh!

    Like 2
    • Srt8

      My pocketbook won’t even talk to me when it comes to spending $$$.

      Like 1
  26. Phillip Tenney

    Pete Phillips thank you for your post. The mere thought of taking those quads off and putting on a single four or two barrel on it for economy is totally crazy. Just keep your foot out of it.

    Like 2
  27. Nick

    Wow, what a barn find!!! I LOVE the 57 and 58 Plymouths!!! Thank God this one wasn’t painted red and white! And it has power windows, a rare option in those days. I really hope it finds a good home, a Forward Look collector who knows how to maintain it, and will enjoy it for what it is. There is a website dedicated to the forward look Chrysler products, they have links to these cars as they come up on ebay, so I’m sure they know all about it. There’s also a lot of information about Miss Belvedere, the one that Tulsa, OK marinated in fresh water for 50 years. That was a crying shame.

    Like 5
  28. mlm

    Harley Earl/GM got dethroned in 1957 by Virgil Exner’s Chrysler products and yes that is why the 1958 Chevy/Pontiac design was a 1 year only design because of Chrysler.

    Like 4
  29. Ed P

    ‘57 Plymouth’s were notoriously rust prone. That this Fury survived so nicely is just amazing.

    Like 2
  30. Kenneth Carney

    Mike, there was such an engine. It was
    the 260 CID Hy Fire V-8 that cranked out
    165 HP with a 2bbl carb, or 177HP with
    a Carter 4bbl unit. These were around
    from 1955 to 1959. The 318 shown here
    is the “Power Spare” unit that was available from 1957-1966, when the
    Polyspheric engine took over. This engine was damn near bulletproof and
    you could take this engine, commit
    general mayhem with it, and it would
    still run. Owned a ’59 Sport Fury with a
    305 HP 361V-8 mated to a Torqueflite
    tranny. Bought it off a friend of Dad’s
    for $400. Dad’s friend sold it to me
    cheap because he couldn’t find a set of
    factory exhaust tips! After I found and
    installed the exhaust tips, I sold the car
    on for $2K and made a tidy profit. Those
    were the days!

    Like 1
  31. mark Struglia

    I believe the owner/agent wants $65,000.00. I bet it ends up in North Carolina. Just saying…The Forward Look Museum needs it.

    Like 1
  32. Raymond Oeverndiek

    I had a 1959 Plymouth Fury 2 door hardtop in 1963. I sold it for $20.00 in 1965. I still bend over and kick myself.

    • Robert Rossi

      Back in ’62 I used to wash a ’59 Fury Golden Commando for my dad’s co-worker. He was in the process of selling it. I had just gotten my license then and couldn’t afford it. That car screamed!!!!

      Like 1
  33. Chuck Foster Chuck F 55chevy

    I think Mopars in 1957 came with 2 or 4 headlights, depending on state regulations?

  34. Bill Beames

    Brings to mind my first new car purchase. A 1957 Plymouth Plaza with radio and heater. It was powered by the 318 V8 and purchased new at the dealer in Salina Kansas as I was stationed at Smoky Hill AFB

    Like 2
  35. PAPERBKWRITER

    Back in the day you couldn’t give a Plymouth with a V8 away. They all burned oil and they experienced a lot of engine failures. Especially scorned by gear heads who were buying Chevy or Ford.

    • Robert Rossi

      Yeah, but the Ford & Chevy couldn’t beat them…….

      Like 2
  36. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    Sold for $65,000.

    Like 1
  37. Gay Car Nut

    The first time I saw a Plymouth Fury was in the John Carpenter movie, Christine. At the time, I didn’t know a whole lot about cars, but I knew what I liked. I found both the 1957 and 1958 Plymouth more attractive than the 1959 and 1960 Plymouth.

    Like 1
    • Bob Rossi

      GayCarNut, I have to disagree, I think the ’59’s are the ultimate!!

    • Ed P

      The 57’s single headlight looked odd to me. The dual lights made the 58-60 Plymouth’s look better.

    • mlm

      I’m with you.The ONLY full size Plymouths I would want is the ’57 or ’58,but the ’59 don’t look too shabby either.

      Like 1
      • Gay Car Nut

        The 59 Plymouth doesn’t look bad overall. It’s way better looking (IMHO) than the 1960, particularly when you look at the front of the car.

        Like 1
    • Richard Gaskill

      You didn’t see a Plymouth Fury in the movie Christine . https://www.imcdb.org/v002477.html

  38. Gay Car Nut

    @ Bob Rossi It’s okay for you to disagree with me. I still prefer the 1958 Plymouth. :)

    Like 2
  39. Gay Car Nut

    @ Richard Gaskill Stephen King apparently didn’t know that much about cars when he wrote the book.

    Like 2
    • Richard Gaskill

      Yees,Yes, that’s very obvious. Things get worse with the movie productions. Did you see Junior Johnson running moonshine in a Mustang in “Last American Hero”?

    • Car Nut Tacoma

      What was Stephen King looking for when he wrote the book “Christine”? I seem to remember in the movie a 1958 Plymouth. I couldn’t tell whether it was a Fury or a Belvedere, I didn’t know a whole lot about cars back in 1983. I was only 10 yrs old at the time! But I knew what I found attractive. And I loved the red colour that was used for the car.

  40. Tim Bryant

    I used to own one of these back in the day, somewhere north of 1962. A truly beautiful automobile. Mine had swivel bucket seats, an I thought that they all came that way. I like the swivels a lot better than the bench that is in this one. I had this one about 6 months, and was going home after a night of beer drinking in Boulder, Co. and just past the toll station, my engine broke. I replaced it with a rebuilt 318, and traded it straight across for a 57 chev 2dr hdtp. Boy did I get the better of that trade. However I would give anything I could afford for another.

  41. Brendon Brant

    I need a pair of those 57 and cleaners if anyone has some by any chance. I know they’re very rare but thought I’d ask

  42. david reedman

    There used to be a 1957 Sprt Fury like this in Langhorne, Pa in the 1960s that was chopped and shortened with just the front seat. It was in magazines and the guy called it The Angel. Has anyone heard about this car or seen it anywhere.

  43. Jim Georges

    I bought a used 1957 gold fury when I was in my twenties. I really liked the car. Didn’t realize what I really had until now when I am in my eighties. I would like to have another one, but they are out of my price range now. I had it up to one hundred thirty five miles a hour one Sunday afternoon on a two lane highway. Became afraid of the speed and never took it above one hundred again. Great memories!

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