Surprise Packet: 1972 Triumph TR6

In my own humble opinion, the Triumph TR6 is the most attractive of the “TR” series of sports cars. It has a tougher stance than its predecessors and of the subsequent TR7 and TR8. This one is a vehicle where the toughness is more than just skin deep, and the modifications that have been performed should provide an interesting and rewarding driving experience. It is located in Tomball, Texas, and is listed for sale here on eBay. The owner has set a BIN of $21,999, but the option is available to make an offer.

Compared to its predecessors, the TR6 had much squarer styling, and some of the color choices, such as this car’s Damson Maroon, made the car look even more purposeful. The body and paint on this car look to be in really good order, with only a few minor paint chips to deal with. Those deeply-dished wheels and beauty rings appear to be in extremely good condition, while the black soft-top also looks good. There really doesn’t appear to be much to fault outside the car, so let’s take a look and see how the interior fares.

The interior of the Triumph presents even better than the exterior, with quilted black seat upholstery, and a timber dash. The upholstery on the seats and door trims appears to be in first-class condition, as does the carpet. The dash in the TR6 is a bit of an upgrade and is finished in beautiful walnut. The switches and gauges also appear to be really nice, but that aftermarket gauge resting on top of the dash gives a subtle hint that things might be more than a bit different with this TR6.

Popping the hood reveals this car’s strongly beating heart. The standard TR6 had to make do with a 2,498cc straight-six engine, which sends its 105hp to the rear wheels via a 4-speed manual transmission. Someone has breathed heavily on this TR6, and while it still retains its original six, it has been blessed with a supercharger. This means that the car packs a bit more punch, and while the owner can’t confirm the actual power output, it is estimated to be at least 140hp, although it could be a bit more. To make the best use of those additional ponies, the standard 4-speed manual transmission has been consigned to the past, and shifting duties are now performed by a 5-speed manual Toyota transmission. This upgrade was performed using a quality conversion kit to ensure reliability. In recent times the Triumph has also received plenty of maintenance work to its brakes, steering, and suspension, and it is said to run and drive extremely well. For the next owner’s peace of mind, the seller is including a very comprehensive set of service records for the TR6, with these dating back to at least 1976.

One of the greatest criticisms that has been leveled at British sports cars of yesteryear is that they often lack power and some mechanical refinement. It appears that these issues have been addressed in this TR6, and I would be willing to bet that this could potentially be an extremely entertaining little car to drive. I know that there will be purists who will decry the modifications that have been made, but the beauty of them is that they are modifications that aren’t irreversible. Would you reverse them, or would you drive and enjoy this little British classic exactly as it stands today?

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Keefer Zeller

    I don’t see a thing wrong with what’s been done to it. Not sure it’s worth the asking but, If I could fit in it, I’d make an offer. Alas, my frame is bigger than its frame.

    Like 6
  2. Jack Hammer

    As much as I like this Triumph, and admire the upgrades, I’m still in fine remembrance of my TR-3 that I bought from Don LaJoie’s junkyard for $200.

    Like 1
    • Eric Ringstrom

      South Norwalk Ct?
      Oh the good old days.

      • Jack Hammer

        You bet. Fun times.

  3. KEVIN L HARPER

    Looks like a nice car and I hope he gets his ask.
    Transmission change is a plus.
    I think 140 hp is kind of low though. I am building my third hotrod version of this engine using lots of Richard good parts and I am pulling out between 190 to 210 hp normally aspirated. At this level the engine is strong but it does take a lot of work. Everything from gp3 cams to line boring to install cam bearings, to running JE pistons and triple webers. I am trying to talk a customer into going with TB as I think the engine could produce a lot more. The toyota trans is good for these levels but the diff has to have mounting reinforced and we are considering going to a jag or BMW diff.
    A lot of fun can be had with these.

    Like 7
  4. Pete W.

    Regarding Kevin’s diff reinforcement comment: Didn’t these things have a habit of snapping the frame crossmember where the diff mounted, even with stock horsepower? If you heard a clunk on acceleration, that was probably the reason.

    In my limited sports car selling days, I remember the boss telling me to watch out for that on TR-6 trade-ins. Very common and megabucks to repair.

  5. chris lawrence

    I would run very far away from this. These cars would fall apart if pushed hard with the naturally aspirated version. Cant imagine what would happen to this car after a few times of spirited driving.

    Like 2
  6. KEVIN L HARPER

    Uhh yeah let me be nice.

    The diff reinforcement parts cost less than a hundred bucks. And it takes a day to do. I usually charge about 4 hours to do it. If that is a lot than perhaps the classic car hobby is not for you.

    TR6’s are brutish machines and while they don’t handle like a modern monocoque sports car, they can and should be driven hard. If you are driving a worn out POS hard it will break, but a well sorted machine is solid and fun.

    Like 13
  7. bobhess bobhess Member

    Going with Kevin. Built a street/autocross car for a customer with bumped up horsepower, stiffer/lower springs, tube shock upgrade and the diff reinforcement unit. Hardest part of the whole job was modifying the stock carbs for more power in the higher rpm bands. Car was autocrossed a minimum of once a month for over 5 years without a single malfunction. Get enough of the British out or modified and you get a pretty sturdy car.

    Like 4
  8. luke arnott Member

    The early ones had fuel injection,which was rubbish.They switched to twin carburation,which improved things a bit.

  9. Randy Mccumber

    I owned a 74, completely stock and loved the car. However, electrics by Lucas a.k.a. ” the prince of darkness” was the cause of endless headaches for me and the dealership.

    Like 1
  10. TimM

    Talk about a gun car!! I have driven these but never had one!! This one with a supercharger would definitely be a blast!!!

  11. Dougie Member

    No. I mean they’re British cars and therefore are quirky. But, Adam, straight up, the real Triumph is the TR-4. It’s raw but the essence. Similar to Datsun. Hands down if you’re in the know, you’ll chose the 240z over a 280.

  12. JMB#7

    She is nice, and needs a good home. As for the price.. well, you get what you pay for…. if I had it, I probably would not part with it for much less than that. I do find the HP number rather low for supercharged, but it appears to be just a guess.

    Like 1
  13. V8roller

    Great drive. A throbbing torpedo of machinery just 4’11” wide.
    I had a 74, UK injection car, with somewhat hopped-up engine. The Lucas injection is well sorted and reliable nowadays.
    Nissan R200 lsd with a Goodparts kit.
    Never did understand the logic of a 5-speed. I had o/d on 2,3,4, so that was seven gears. How is five gears ‘better’?

    Like 2
  14. DayDreamBeliever Member

    Looks like the seller didn’t find someone to take the car for his asking price. eBay doesn’t show it has having been sold.

    Like 1

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.