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Take Your Pick: 1967 Mercury Comet Capri x 2

Tackling a project build will always involve making some choices. Some of these decisions can be pretty straightforward, while others can involve a degree of agonizing. For enthusiasts searching for a 1967 Mercury Comet Capri, the first choice they will need to make is which of these cars they would purchase for their project build. The owner is offering a pair of these classics for sale, and both have their good and bad points. The owner is asking the same price for each car, and they both represent an affordable starting point for a restoration project. The Mercurys are located in Boise, Idaho, and have been listed for sale here on Facebook. The asking price for each is a reasonable $1,000, although potential buyers might be tempted to consider purchasing the pair so that they have a ready supply of parts on hand.

The Cardinal Red Mercury is the more complete of the two vehicles on offer. It looks like it once sported a vinyl top, but that is now a distant memory. It seems like the car has some rust appearing in the lower extremities, but there’s no information on the state of the frame or floors. There is plenty of surface corrosion to address, and while the panels look pretty respectable, the hood has been bent. All of the exterior trim is present, and most of it looks like it could restore quite well. The vehicle comes equipped with tinted glass, and once again, this appears to generally be in good order.

When we turn our attention to the Lime Frost Mercury, we are confronted with a car that is also essentially complete. Once again, we have no concrete information on the floors and the frame, but its overall condition appears to be a rung above that of the Red car. No significant rust is visible in the lower extremities, with only some small spots visible around one rear wheel opening. The panels are straighter on this car, and the overall condition of the exterior trim looks to be better than on the other vehicle. This Mercury also features tinted glass, and this looks to be pretty presentable.

The next area to assess with these two Mercurys is the interior, and there’s little to choose between the two. Both feature bench front seats and both are in desperate need of restoration. This will be a full-on proposition because it looks like all of the upholstered surfaces in both cars have deteriorated beyond the point of no return. While there is little to separate them, the Green car probably scores on a couple of points. It still has the factory radio sitting in the dash, and it looks like the original owner ordered the car with air conditioning. It seems like all of the interior hardware for this remains intact, but nothing is present under the hood.

So, to this point, the Green Mercury appears to be a leader. However, things take a turn when we lift the hoods on both cars. The Red car seems to have an intact drivetrain, although the 289ci V8 that occupies the engine bay doesn’t run. The Green Comet has nothing in the engine bay but a lot of fresh air because both the engine and transmission are long gone. Getting the existing 289 running will not be the work of five minutes, but it does provide the buyer something with which to work. Even if the buyer can coax the motor back to life, it will only offer around 200hp. That’s hardly an earth-shattering figure, and it will mean that the Mercury would be a competent performer, at best. I suspect anyone who tackles this project will probably slot something with a few more ponies under the hood.

There’s a lot to absorb with this pair of 1967 Mercurys, and both cars have their strong points and their weaknesses. Both vehicles are also being sold with titles, meaning that there’s nothing to separate them on that front either. If you were looking at these cars intending to tackle a project, would you choose one over the other? Or would you bite the bullet and score the pair so that you had a ready supply of parts? Over to you.

Comments

  1. Big_Fun Member

    Man…it’s late as I write this, but I swear that’s a ’76 Malibu Classic bench seat in the red car…

    Like 9
    • Jon.in.Chico

      No headrests on the ’67 Mercury …

      Like 5
    • Don Eladio

      I believe you are correct…or Monte Carlo?

      Like 1
    • Mike Skinner

      I agree. I had a 66 Ford Fairlane which was essentially the same car. The front bench seat looked nothing like that.

      Like 0
  2. Gary Rhodes

    For two grand it’s a steal

    Like 14
    • Steve R

      That’s a great price if they are viable project. Even if they turn out to be nothing more than parts cars the next owner still did well. I’m surprised that are still listed after 3 days.

      Steve R

      Like 6
  3. Sam Shive

    I’ll Take Two …….and Make One ……..

    Like 8
    • Akira Davis

      Haha thats what I am doing to it right now.

      Like 1
  4. HC Member

    Fair price for both so I would get both. The 289 can be warmed up to a 351 with a Lunatti cam. Good find.

    Like 4
    • Don Eladio

      How does a cam turn a 289, miraculously, into a 351? Is this a magical cam that only Lunati makes (yes, that’s the proper spelling)?

      Like 3
      • HC Member

        A 289 and 351 have the same block. Just update cam and firing order to a 351. Updated pushrods and heads recommended.

        Like 0
      • HC Member

        If you know your way around a Ford small block, you’d know that a 289 and 351 blocks are the same. Just dress it out with updated cam,rods and heads. Voilla, a warmed up 289 into a 351 performance engine.

        Like 0
      • Steve R

        HC, the blocks are not the same. They are related and share some dimensions, but the deck heights are different, that’s why the 289/302 and 351W’s use different intake manifolds.

        Steve R

        Like 13
  5. Snotty

    Had a 67 mercury Caliente, baby blue with a white top. 289 auto, nicer and less seen than a fairlane. Ran great till I was getting ready to go see a friend a few hundred miles away. Made the BIG mistake of having grease monkey change oil. Never run right again. Buy em both for 1800. maybe less. Prefer the vertical rear tailights.

    Like 4
    • Don Eladio

      I doubt that it was the oil change that made the car run differently, lol…but, okay.

      Like 0
  6. HoA Howard A Member

    Whenever I see these, I think of Jack Chrisman who has the honor of the 1st flip up funny car body. Ford was the hottest stick in the mid ’60’s.

    Like 5
  7. chrlsful

    really like these ‘stacked hdlghts”, esp a shorty (lght weight, 100 in WB). By today’s standards they are large. I’d drive either daily, prefer a waggy tho…

    Like 3
  8. HC Member

    If you know your way around a Ford small block, you’d know that a 289 and 351 blocks are the same. Just dress it out with updated cam,rods and heads. Voilla, a warmed up 289 into a 351 performance engine.

    Like 0
    • Anav8r

      HC, I think you left a step or two out of your 289 to 351 conversion tactics.

      Like 6
    • RSparks

      Not my intent to call anyone out. Just want to offer a bit of info. The 260, 289 and 302W blocks are pretty much the same because they share an 8.2” deck height but the 351W is different because it has a 9.5” deck height. This is why the 351W is more favorable for HP applications.

      Like 7
    • John Taylor

      The 351 is a taller block so not really the same.

      Like 8
  9. HC Member

    Ford Small blocks for 289 and 351 are the same. Only difference is how you dress them out. Of course firing order is changed. And if you know what you’re doing a 289 can be warmed up to a 351 status pretty easily. Ive only done it a half dozen times. How many times have you done one?

    Like 1
  10. HC Member

    If you are rebuilding a small block Ford at a machine shop. Most all blocks versions are essentially the same. 260,289,302,351.I just rebuilt a 289 from a 66 Mustang and dressed it out to a 351. New cam, heads,pushrods and firing order to a 351. The basics for the blocks are the same.

    Like 0
  11. Steve Clinton

    HC, what a rude know-it-all!

    Like 4
    • HC Member

      When wanna bes want to correct me on spelling of Lunati but don’t know anything about the basics and that most Ford small blocks being the same or compatible, your damn right I am

      Like 2
  12. HC Member

    Sorry, but you’re absolutely wrong. All Ford small blocks from the 60s are essentially the same. 260,289,302 and 351. Of course only differences being the bigger FE blocks.. all small blocks are the same depending on similar yrs. If you’ve ever actually rebuilt one at the machine shop you would know this.

    Like 0
    • Steve R

      Nice tactic. When wrong change what you were saying, in this case by adding the word essentially, then double down.

      It would have been easier to have done your research prior to calling out everyone when they were actually the ones that gave out accurate information.

      Steve R

      Like 7
      • HC Member

        Not at all. All Small block Fords are the same and any machine shop will confirm as much. How you update them with Edelbrock intakes,heads carb,cam and pushrods is entirely up to you when doing a rebuild.. But all small block Fords are the same.

        Like 1
  13. HC Member

    Steve R why don’t you check with any machine shop that you have dealt with and confirm that most small block Fords within certain yrs are essentially the same. And can be built the way you want them. Ie 289 to a 351. Wanna be know it alls can be a real Pita when they don’t know what they’re talking about.

    Like 1
    • Frankfurt

      The 300SL gullwings and 225 mopars were both slant sixes, ask any machine shop

      Like 1
  14. HC Member

    I was saying you could warm this 67 289 up to a 351 if you rebuilt it correctly, because the blocks are the same. And you certainly can.. I have done it a few times. Doesn’t matter that a stock 351 height is different than a stock 289. But the Ford small blocks are essentially the same for any rebuilding purposes. Ask your local machine shop and you can confirm this.

    Like 0
  15. Johnny

    The 289 with the 2 barrel will run all day at highway speed. Why build a super fast motor. If it is hard to get good gas to run in it? When building up any motor. Their other parts to work on also. These would be nice project and worth the asking price. Why put alot of money in a race car. If your only gonna take it to a car show. Take it to the track and see what you have. I,d fix what they needed and drive it and enjoy it. Not everybody car afford a machine shop to do the work and alot of times they do shoddy work too.

    Like 3
  16. chuck

    Whoa.
    Easy does it boys. We all like old cars.
    Take a deep breath and I’m sure everything will be OK.

    Like 8
  17. Ron

    HC, the bore for the 289, 302 and 351 are all 4” but the stroke is 2.87” on the 289, 3” on the 302 and 3.5” on the 351 so in order to upgrade a 289 to a 302 or a 351 you are going to have to change the crankshaft to one with the correct stroke, if you don’t change the crank then you still have a 289 regardless of what other changes you make. You can call it a 351 if you like, but it’s not! Rods, camshafts and firing order changes have nothing to do with cubic inches, no matter how many times you do it, just saying…

    Like 9
    • HC Member

      All I said was you can certainly warm up a 289 to run more like a 351. Especially, if during the build you use a stroker crank. The 260,289,302 small blocks are the same. 351 does have a thicker, stronger block and a raised deck height

      Like 0
      • Ron

        Yeah, well the reason I replied and the reason others commented that you had skipped a couple of steps is that you totally didn’t mention changing the crank, which is the only thing that actually would change the displacement. Guess we’re on the same page now.

        Like 2
  18. Gary Chapman

    I would buy the lime frost just for the colour,love it

    Like 2
  19. William

    Wow looking at two junk fords and it turns into a pissing contest lmao 🤣🤣🤣🤣 to funny more entertaining than the cars 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣👍

    Like 8
    • chuck

      Careful, they might turn on you next 🤣

      Like 4
  20. philthyphil

    FE 428 427 then go from there

    Like 0
  21. Al

    wow love my old fords but last small block work on was a 1956 312 great engine after where only 390 and 406 which where the same block tri power 1961 390 401hp 406 tri power was 405 and before everone starts writing yes ford call it a 6 barrel

    Like 0
  22. Russ

    If the 351 is no different than 302,289. Try putting a 351 intake on a 302,289 and 260. See how that works for ya. I may add to that a 260 has different bell housing bolt pattern. You can put 351 heads, cam and crank in the smaller blocks. If you use the distributor out of a 351 you have to change the gear on the distributor. Just my experience with dealing ford engineering. Not trying to cause any bent attitudes.

    Like 1
  23. RSparks

    There are a few guys on here who are dead right and some who are dead wrong. I’m not going to say who they are because I’ve been building and trading classic Fords for about 35 years and I still learn new things myself. That is what I enjoy the most because knowledge is power. The best way I’ve found to learn is to humble yourself, keep your mouth shut and listen. If someone says something you know is wrong, just be glad you know it is wrong because it will save you money and heart ache. I hope I can pick up what I’m putting down myself. This thread has been a challenge LOL.

    Like 4
  24. Mike mazerall

    Is there any way to find if these cars are still available??
    I’m in Boston no matter how much I try I can’t get to the Boisi Idaho market place! Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    Thank you Mike M

    Like 0
    • Akira Davis

      Sorry dude im the idiot who bought those two 9 months ago….

      Like 0
  25. Quint Conner

    Really? Did they turn out to be a bad deal or something?
    I want that green one!!

    Like 0

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