406 Tri-Power: 1962 Ford Galaxie 500

During the 1960s, two technological races were capturing the imagination of the American public. The first was the space race, as the US battled the USSR to set the first person on the moon. The second was the horsepower race, with various manufacturers producing more potent vehicles designed to demonstrate their engineering prowess. Both races reached their zenith at the end of the decade with Neil Armstrong’s “one small step” and the peak of the muscle car era. This 1962 Ford Galaxie 500 perfectly demonstrates the horsepower race, with its 406ci Tri-Power V8 offering plenty of performance under the driver’s right foot. The vehicle is solid and presents well, but it would take little to lift its overall presentation to a higher level. The Galaxie is listed here on Craigslist in Pollok, Texas. It could be yours for $29,500, and I must say a big thank you to Barn Finder Pat L. for spotting it for us.

Ford produced the ’62 Galaxie in five body styles, with the VIN for this car confirming it as a Two-Door Club Victoria. It presents well in its original shade of Rangoon Red, although it is unclear whether it received any previous restoration work. The paint shines nicely, but the seller admits it would benefit from a buff. The panels are as straight as an arrow, but the lack of significant rust may tempt some potential buyers. The panels are clean, while the underside shots reveal no significant drama. There is obvious surface corrosion the new owner might want to treat before it deteriorates, but any penetrating rust is a candidate for patches rather than wholesale steel replacement. The bumpers have some rust, and a trip to the platers will be on the agenda. The remaining trim and glass look good, with nothing missing or damaged. The wheels aren’t original, and while they suit the car’s character, the buyer will probably choose to source the correct items and hubcaps to maximize the value of their investment.

Lifting this Galaxie’s hood reveals what sets it apart from the crowd. Its engine bay houses a Tri-Power-equipped G-Code 406ci monster producing 405hp and 448 ft/lbs of torque. The power feeds to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual transmission, while Ford deleted power assistance for the steering and brakes to maximize engine performance. The killer blow for the Galaxie was its weight, with this car tipping the scales at 3,880lbs. However, the brute strength of the 406 means it should storm the ¼-mile in 14.3 seconds before winding its way to 137mph. American manufacturers were heavily committed to drag racing during this period. Ford confirmed this late in the 1962 model year by releasing eleven special-build Galaxies featuring fiberglass and aluminum body parts that carved around 400lbs off the Galaxie’s weight. The seller indicates this car features its numbers-matching G-Code that was rebuilt by a renowned specialist in 2003. They hold the documentation and spec sheet confirming the work and state the car has seen little active service since. The transmission isn’t original, although it retains the factory shifter. The car runs well, but the seller states it needs a front-end alignment. A collection of new parts is included that the seller can squirrel away for a rainy day.

The Galaxie’s interior presents well for its age, with vinyl upholstery in an attractive combination of Red and White. There is no evidence of significant wear or abuse, with the carpet and dash equally impressive. There are aftermarket additions designed to improve comfort and monitor the health of that brute under the hood, but the buyer could remove these if they crave originality. These include a wood-rimmed wheel, a column-mounted tachometer, a gauge cluster, and an 8-track player hanging under the dash. With those items removed, the interior would present as it did the day the car rolled off the showroom floor.

Although it isn’t 100% original, this 1962 Galaxie 500 would undoubtedly attract attention and plenty of knowledgeable comments wherever it goes. The seller indicates that with its recent addition to the 1962 Ford Galaxie Registry, 106 of these classics are known to exist. There are undoubtedly others that haven’t made the Registry, but it is still a relatively rare vehicle. With only minor rust for the buyer to tackle, lifting its presentation and condition to a higher level should not prove challenging. Recent sales results for similar vehicles above $45,000 suggest it would be worth the effort. This classic has been on the market for less than a day, and I suspect it won’t take long for someone to give it a new home.

Comments

  1. Gatormario

    “The car runs well, but the seller states it needs a front-end alignment”. If that’s all it needs, I can’t understand why the seller wouldn’t have this done before putting the car up for sale.

    Like 44
    • Greg Gustafson

      word!

      Like 10
    • MarkoBravo

      I agree, but it may be something like my circumstances, where I need to install all the necessary OEM replacement parts b4 taking it to alignment shop, and lack time to get it done, $ to pay to get it done, and/or reliable (trustworthy) family members to do it on barter/favor payment.
      You, or someone ya know might relate to this reply.

      Like 6
  2. Greg Gustafson

    I remember when these induction systems were call “3 deuces” What changed?

    Like 7
    • Blue

      We changed it, each had our own cute moniker; Triple 2’s, 6 Packs, 3-2’s, Deuces, Half a Dozen, 6 to Go, even Four + Twos, etc

      I don’t even know the first to offer it, I had a ’58 J-2 Olds, saw many Chevy 348’s, earlier Jags, MGs called side drafts. They were a big after market cabbled together mess, Dad talked about a having a 40’s Ford so equipped. And you have to guess the early racers tried; Stutts Bearcats, and the like.

      Like 3
      • MarkoBravo

        Yessir, even 1st gen Z’car owners can relate!

        Like 2
    • al

      3 deuces was the hotroders term gm and mostly Pontiac called it tri power Ford called it 6 barrel and I believe Mopar may have called it a 6 pack

      • Greg Gustafson

        And this is a Ford, right?

      • 19sixty5 Member

        Pontiac introduced the 3 2 barrel carb setup in 1957 and called it the “Tri-Power”. A 3 2 barrel setup was offered by virtually every US manufacturer after that. Pontiac continued to offer the Tri-Power through 1966. GM corporate banned multiple carb setups beginning in 1967, EXCEPT for the Corvette. My Tri-Power 65 GTO license plate reads 3 2S. Funny that the song Little GTO refers to the setup as three deuces!

        Like 1
      • al

        introduced by Pontiac in 1957 on their new model called the Bonneville came with a 4 Barrell tri power or fuel injection thing was the tri power was faster than the fueley.

  3. Rw

    Just like the classic line ,”Air conditioner only needs charge”

    Like 20
    • Buddy

      “easy fix”…

      Like 4
  4. Big C

    Or, “just needs a tune up.”

    Like 14
    • Rw

      Don’t forget the best ever”Just needs a oil change”

      Like 8
  5. Billyray

    Looks like no heat or ac either.

    Like 2
    • Chuck Dickinson

      It HAS a heater, just not connected (the panel is in the dash). AC, PS, and PB were not available on 406s/427s.

      Like 3
  6. Matt

    I think you mean 107 or 97 in the quarter, 137 Seems a little off 🙂

    Like 4
    • Buddy

      137 is referring to the top end speed

      Like 6
    • Bellingham Fred

      137 is overall top speed not 1/4 mile.

      Like 6
  7. Robert

    Wow, brings back memories. I actually had a 62 with the 406 tri-power. I was about 18-19 years old when I had it. It met it’s demise when someone I beat in a race sabotaged it by dropping some nuts and bolts down the carb. I hate exterior hood releases. After the engine was destroyed I traded it even for a 73 Road Runner with the 400ci truck motor.

    Like 4
  8. Blue

    I thought I knew cars from that era, and I did know and saw the lightweight drag cars on the track, I actually think we called them Lightings. But I can’t recall lusting after this beauty, so either I have forgotten or it was rare/expensive. I wish I had the money and garage space, I envy the next owner.

    • 19sixty5 Member

      Lightweights was the term I remember. Aluminum front ends, acid dipped bodies, thinner glass, Pontiac’s infamous “Swiss Cheese” frames, etc, the good old days!

      Like 5
  9. Emel

    Use to see quite a few of these back in the ….guess what….1960’s.
    Not crazy about the front or the rear of these boats.
    The side angle is nice ! lol

    Like 3
    • Blue

      You were not able into see quite a few in my neck of the woods, and I don’t know anyone that did not like the side view of the slant rear window of the 63 1/2 the best. NASCAR drivers got to see the back of them starting with the 1964 Daytona often.

      Like 3
  10. Troy s

    She’s so sweet looking just don’t get her mad, she’ll shut You down! Take that Beach Boys!! Aha!
    Just a Ford fan, got to love the rare 406..

    Like 3
    • al

      as a Ford fan you must remember the year before this in 1961 the 390. 401hp with tri power very rare great engine friend had one in a starliner great car

      Like 5
      • Greg Gustafson

        Capitalization and punctuation would make your posts easier to read.

        Like 2
      • Troy s

        The strongest running 390 from the factory I can think of,,, much more than the 390 in the Fairlane GT/GTA cars. Like the rare Starliner!

        Like 2
  11. al

    had a 390 4 speed in a new 1968 Torino gt fast back loved that car bought it off the show room floor had Firestone wide ovals anyone remember them

    Like 1
    • Greg Gustafson

      You were pretty cool back then if you had Wide Ovals on your car. I was in high school and put a set on my 55 Nomad, but I still wasn’t cool. Back then, the Nomad was still just a station wagon. :/

      Like 2
      • Blue

        And a 2-door station wagon at that, all of us have stories about the ones we should have not sold, yours is just sad. At least I enjoyed my Harrell 427 Nova!

        And I bet you were much cooler than you are saying, wasn’t there a line in “Farris Bueler’s Day Off” , “It my be a POS, but at least you have a POS”. I had a ’58 Olds, 3-2’s though.

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