Affordable Driver: 1941 Dodge Luxury Liner

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With very little history on its past, this ’41 Dodge Luxury Liner looks to be a cheap project. For sale by an auto dealership, this Dodge does drive, and isn’t too shabby. The brakes are noted as needing immediate attention as they are seized, but otherwise this looks to be an easy project to get driving safely.  Priced at just $3,500 we are wishing we had more time and space for this one. Find it here on craigslist out of Fremont, California.

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For a $3,500 project, the interior looks mighty nice. The seats look great as does the rest of the interior. There is a bad spot in the driver side carpet, and the dashboard could likely use a little tlc. The exterior looks surprising straight. The paint is an interesting combination, looking to have been a project that came to a halt. The rear fenders look to have been wet sanded, but to what reason, it is unknown. There is no apparent rot, but there is some surface rust on the running boards. Aside from that the body of this Dodge looks pretty solid. There are no photos of the engine, but this Dodge is likely powered by a Flathead inline 6 with a manual column shifted transmission. Although the engine is noted as running, and driving.

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Although this dodge does not wear the most pleasant colors of paint, this running driving Dodge seems like a great deal, and a simple project to work on as you drive. The dealership selling it even finances for those of us short on cash for a cool car. What would you do with this ’41 Dodge Luxury Liner?

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Comments

  1. Scotty Staff

    That’s a heck of a car for $3,500! Nice find, Brian!

  2. geomechs geomechs Member

    Nice driver for $35K? I think it would be great. Drive it and enjoy it. Eventually it will need some refurbishing but for now, have a good time with it…

  3. Peter L.

    Colors are very similar to my ’56 Studie Sky Hawk.

  4. Rex Kahrs Member

    Those front and rear bumpers are interesting, sort of DOT-looking. Reminds me of the rear bumper of the ’74 BMW 2002.

  5. Scott in San Jose

    Not too far from me. If anyone is interested I can stop by and take a look. Not a Dodge expert by any means. Know my way around ’40’s cars and inline flatheads.

    • Rocco

      Is it supposed to have a flathead? I was wondering since there wasn’t an under hood pic. Other than no under hood & trunk pic, nice presentation.
      Pretty cool car for the 40’s era.

  6. karld

    Did you see in the ad where it says “extended warranty available”??? Hmm…cut-and-paste error!

  7. Loco Mikado

    King of the sleazo used car dealers. The bottom of the barrel we will do anything to get your money separated from your pockets to ours. They aren’t even smart enough to know what the transmission is, possibly the first year of fluid drive in Dodges. Certainly not an automatic. Too bad, looks like a halfway decent car for $2,000.00 not $3,500.00 but the stereotype used car schtick turns me off. It would make me feel dirty just to set foot on the lot. I have known too many used car salesmen to even begin to trust them, they all sit around and brag about how they shafted their customers, both buying and selling. There is a reason why since I started driving in1966 I have never bought a car from a dealer. My dad who used to be a salesman(but never cars)told me never buy from a lot.

    • David Montanbeau

      Fluid Drive is the trademarked name that Chrysler Corporation assigned to a transmission driveline combination offered from 1939 through 1953 in Chryslers, 1940 through 1953 in DeSotos, and from 1941 through 1954 in Dodge models. The fluid drive element was a hydraulic coupling inserted in place of the flywheel, and performed the same function as a modern torque converter, only without torque multiplication. A conventional clutch and three-speed or four-speed manual transmission were installed behind the fluid coupling, although a semi-automatic was optional from 1941 for Chrysler and DeSoto and from 1949 for Dodge.

  8. Rex Rice

    The ’41 Dodge was the first with ‘Fluid Drive’ which is bad as it sounds. Even though there is a clutch pedal, one could come to a stop without pushing it down. The trans had a fluid coupling so all you had to do was step on the gas when the light turned green. You were in 2nd gear, (automatically), so you floored the gas pedal & watched all the other cars, no matter what brand, run away from you. This was a huge step down in performance for Chrysler Motors. My ’40 Dodge with normal transmission & clutch would leave these way behind.

    • Marty Parker

      How did it get into 2nd gear automatically?

  9. Wrong Way

    LOL! I feel the love

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