Golf Yellow Roundie: 1972 BMW 2002

This 1972 BMW 2002 is a desirable round light model, otherwise known as a “roundie,” that wears one of the more vibrant 2002 colors known as Golf Yellow. While I’m not 100% sold that this is the original shade of paint (more on that later), the seller does a nice job of presenting the car as one that’s been gone through to enable worry-free driving. It features an automatic transmission and is listed here on eBay with bidding over $13,000 and no reserve.

I was going to call bunk on the seller’s description of the 2002 as a genuine Golf Yellow example, but the inner fender tags with the color code denoted confirm this 2002 left the factory with the iconic paint job. What’s stranger to me is the particular shade of this color looks off (to me) when compared to other examples, which tend to skew towards an almost pastel-yellow shade, whereas this actually looks more like Porsche Fly Yellow to me. I don’t love the missing beltline trim, either, as this smooth look tends to work better on later model vehicles, in my opinion.

The interior is extra clean, with unmarked black carpets and nicely preserved bucket seats. The steering wheel is a classic OEM upgrade from a later E21-series 320i, and while I would go with an earlier Momo Prototipo steering wheel if it were mine, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with this three-spoke unit. The automatic is a serious bummer, and given the seller seems fairly well versed in 2002 ownership, I’m surprised he went for such a car – but perhaps the limited stock of genuine Golf Yellow cars colored his decision, which I can certainly understand. Still, a manual swap seems necessary to me.

I am happy to be called out on my judgment of the originality of the color, as it seems like under the hood and in the door jambs matches the exterior. Perhaps it was a full respray, or maybe my eyes aren’t as good as they used to be in terms of judging color accuracy. The list of maintenance items is extensive and not worth repeating here, but it seems to cover all the major systems – engine, suspension, brakes, and fuel system – to ensure worry-free driving. If it were mine, I’d want to correct the paint, swap the transmission, and lose the generic E30 bottlecap wheels for some period rolling stock. How would you improve it?

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Comments

  1. Luki

    Listen to our story. One night my buddies and I drink a bunch of beers and decide to fix up a slush box 2002.

    We’ll paint it the wrong color, strip off all the trim, the bumper guards, and the rubber impact strips leaving a bunch of holes that we can fill with bolts. Replace the carpet, install front seat covers that don’t match the rear seat, put in a 3-Series steering wheel and top it off with a 1600 dash pod and call it an original interior.
    Then we can put it on EBay and see who won’t be completely embarrassed to cruise through town in this abomination after paying over $13k for it.

    After the buyer figures out what he bought he can at least be consoled by the fact that it’s a matching numbers car. Too bad most 2002 owners could care less if it’s matching numbers or not since it’s only the engine block stamping.

    Like 3
    • Michael Leyshon Member

      Easy there Luki, be Happy !

      Nice “Story” above . Appears a lot of effort went into the car and it looks pretty solid. Not easy to source parts.

      The new owner should only be embarrassed “cruising through town” because they’re driving a funky looking old BMW. Few will notice the details or care, just as it was in 1972…

      Like 2
  2. Rex Kahrs Member

    Not Golf by a long shot.

    Like 1
  3. Roger G

    I had a ’71 2800CS with the BW auto trans, not a great unit.

    Like 2
  4. CCA4480

    We had a Rivera blue tii that was much loved. I also think this particular yellow was a personal choice, and is incorrect. If the vin is provided the last 7 numbers can be run through realoem.com in the archive section. All info including the (3) digit color should pop up. And, I would add back the waistline bright trim back and lose the wheels too.

    Like 1
  5. Achman

    Not even close to Golf. Just send the VIN to BMW Archive and you’ll find out in a day or two what the original color combo was, and when and if the car was imported to USA

    The automatics acquit themselves pretty well, and actually make a semi-usable DD in a state with three seasons

    info.grouparchiv@bmwgroup.com

  6. jeff

    In the trunk is still the original color and you can clearly see the difference to the tone of the respray.

    Like 1
  7. Mountainwoodie

    I’ve had two ’72 2002’s as i’ve said before. First thing I did with my really nice sunroof with dealer installed a/c was take out the slushbox and put in a Getrag 5 speed.

    This one looks worked over. But with enough money you can fix anything.

    Darn sorry I sold either of them. Live and learn.

  8. Gsuffa Gsuffa Member

    Okay, no trim, but left the barnacles.

  9. Dan

    All these guys booing this nice bmw. I would want this car! People forget how rare these are and probably more rare with the automatic trans! Come on people give this fun car a real chance here!!!!!!!

    • Luki

      138,000 02s were manufactured.
      Rare? Hardly.

  10. Rex Kahrs Member

    Off the top of my head, the 2002 was manufactured from 1968 through 1976, and I believe there were a total of about 800,000 units produced. I’m gonna look that up again.

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