Roadside Find: 1948 Plymouth Special Deluxe

1948 Plymouth Special Deluxe

From James J – As they used to say in the girlie magazines, “This never happens to me”, but this morning as I took the dog for her early morning walk I saw in the distance this vehicle parked on my street. Although I am not a car guru, like most of the people on Barn Finds, I do enjoy an old car when I see one. So looking forward to getting a close-up look at this sedan made me walk at a quicker pace. I was totally surprised when I found the handwritten for sale sign on the window. I took these pictures which probably make the paint look better than it is. No dents that I saw but paint is dull. Interior looked redone recently and chrome is fairly pitted and that is all I could find out from my walk around. I do love suicide doors! Is the price too much?

Plymouth For Sale Sign

So guys what do you think of this Plymouth? Is $7,000 to much or is this a good buy? James isn’t sure how interested he is in buying it, but is wondering if the price seemed good to you guys. If you think it is, feel free to snatch it up! I’ve include a shot of the seller’s handwritten for sale sign, but if you aren’t able to read it just let me know and I’ll get you the seller’s info! Special thanks to James for sharing this find with us!

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Comments

  1. The Walrus

    If you follow Jay Leno’s Garage, he would likely call this a ‘Good Old Girl’. A great entry into the hobby. Even with no explanation by the seller, it’s clear from the pics that this is decent car. Solid and well cared for. Probably not worth restoring, but good enough to tinker with and enjoy. The price is definitely reasonable. Old Cars Price Guide from April ’15 lists the following

    1946-48 P15 Special DeLuxe, 6-cyl., 117″ wb

    4d Sed 6: 660 5: 1,970 4: 3,280 3: 7,380 2: 11,480 1: 16,400

    Without further information, I would say that $7,000 is spot on. It’s definitely more 3 than 4.

    3) VERY GOOD: Completely operable original or “older restoration” showing wear. Also, a good amateur restoration, all presentable and serviceable inside and out. Plus, combinations of well-done restoration and good operable components; or a partially restored car with all parts necessary to complete it and/or valuable new old stock (NOS) parts.This is a “20 footer.” That is, from 20 feet away it may appear perfect. But as we approach it, we begin to notice that
    the paint may be getting thin in spots from frequent washing and polishing. Looking inside, we might detect wear on the driver’s seat, foot pedals and carpeting. The chrome trim, while still quite presentable, may have lost its sharp, mirror-like reflective quality it had when new. All systems and equipment on the car are in good operating order. In general, most of the vehicles seen at car shows are in number 3 condition.

    4) GOOD: A drivable vehicle needing no, or only minor work to be functional. Also, a deteriorated restoration or a poor amateur restoration. All components may need restoration to be “excellent,” but the vehicle is mostly usable “as is.” This is a driver. It may be in the process of restoration or its owner may have big plans, but even from 20 feet away, there is no doubt that it needs a lot of help.

  2. Howard A Member

    Thanks to James. Me too. If I see a cool car, I have to look at it, no matter the condition. There’s always great stories about them. When the untrained thinks of an “old car”, these Dodges and Plymouths always come to mind. Probably because they were the most common used car a struggling family could afford. My parents had a postwar Dodge after the war. While this is a great example, for that kind of money ( not out of line) I’d have to know more about the mechanicals, and if no overdrive or gear swap was done, this car will be a handful on the highway. Great car for cruises and shows. I’m sure you’d hear of all the stories people remember with Plymouths and Dodges.

  3. John S

    According to the Hagerty price guide she’s worth 6800 in this kind of shape. I’d buy it for 5-6.

  4. Ed P

    This is a great find. I wish I had the means to buy this one.

  5. AW240Z

    I own one. Mine is all original with 103k, engine never been opened, starts every time (easier than my Z), was a hit at Cars and Coffee (made the featured car last year). I’ve had it since 1979, when I picked it up in Gillette Wyoming. Gave it a tune up and drove it home to SF. These cars are great for loading up 7 or 8 people and cruising XMAS tree lights, idling in parades, and going grocery shopping. Just the most fun and easy to work on. Mine is long in the tooth and has lottsa of patina, but not in a bad way. She is a proud survivor. Mine is ALL there (interior and exterior) and original down to the hubcaps and radio. Even smells old (some of you out there will get that reference). While not a sports car, this car is pure cruising fun. Check out the Clipper ship on the rear tail light, and red Clipper ships on the hub caps. And the color changing speedometer is also an added bonus. Just get in it and drive it. Enough said. I’m going out for pizza – in the Plymouth of course. AW

    • jim s

      i love the cat on the roof. great looking car and i am very glad your still driving it. should turn heads everywhere you go. thanks for sharing.

  6. jim s

    do a PI on this and then make an offer. great way to get into the hobby. put the dog in the passenger seat, she earned it, and have fun. please keep us updated.

  7. guggie

    Great car for a beginner , hit him with your obo and take it from there , polish it , change oil , do a tune up and enjoy the hell out of it , it will still be worth what you paid for it 10 years from now .

    • Oldstuff 1941

      I’m with ‘Guggie’ on this one James J. I would offer $ 4500. on the car and be ready to drive it away. If that’s not enough for the owner, I would then ask what his bottom dollar on the car is. That always works for me. usually,… if you start out low, they will counter with something close to your offer because they know that you were thinking it is worth in that range to you. By asking them about Their bottom dollar, you can give them the chance to let you know where they may be at investment wise, and go from there… Good luck,… it will make a very nice entry into the hobby and you will enjoy the simplicity and cost of being able to work on it yourself…

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