EXCLUSIVE: Original 1966 Thunderbird Town Landau

If you’ve been following the site for very long, you might recognize this Thunderbird. We featured it for the seller, Yvonne B way back in 2017 when she listed a collection of barn finds that had belonged to her son Michael. She ended up moving this car from storage to her home so she could clean it up and has decided to list it by itself to make sure it gets the attention it deserves. It appears to be complete and she believes it to be highly original. If you are interested in the car, be sure to message her via the form below!

What Makes It Special? This is an original car. The body and interior are intack with original fender skirts, power steering, AC, power seats, center console, and the swing-away steering wheel.

Body Condition: The body is fairly clean as it’s been garage kept.

Mechanical Condition: It’s the original engine. It runs and drives.

It’s going to need work, including a new vinyl roof and I see what appears to be some previous rust repair that is failing and will need to be redone properly. The interior is in amazing shape though, so as long as the rust isn’t too serious this could be a nice driver. You can read more about the collection that this car came out of here.

The 390 V8 that powers this car isn’t the most powerful engine that was available in the ’66 Thunderbird, but with 315 horsepower, it’s no slouch. Of course, you’re going to need quite a bit of power to move all that leather and woodgrain around. Yvonne states that it runs and drives as it should, so you could start enjoying it this summer while you work on fixing the cosmetics.

If you’ve been on the hunt for a summer cruiser, this might just be the car for you. So, be sure to take a closer look and message Yvonne with any questions or your best offer via the form below! And stay tuned, she has more cars that we will be listing over the next few days.

  • Location: Newark, New Jersey
  • Mileage: 77,500
  • Title Status: Clean

Contact The Seller

Do you have a classic car that needs to go? Please consider listing it here on Barn Finds!

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Brian Pritt

    Intact I think is what you meant?

    1
  2. ccrvtt

    I grew up in one of those 1950’s subdivisions carved out of an old farm that took forever to fill in. Which was great for the few kids sprinkled throughout because we pretty much had the run of the vacant lots and the old woods with its abandoned maple sugar shack. Eventually some unimaginative local builder put up a house directly across the street from us.

    As it turned out the new owner was a middle-aged – divorced(!) – lady. She was actually a very nice person who kept mostly to herself, got remarried a few years later.

    Where all of this leads is that she owned a car just like this except it was that nondescript pea green-gold. It was a very appropriate car for a proper single woman of a certain age in the mid ’60’s. The original T-bird Landau was introduced in 1962 with a cream body topped by a dusky rose vinyl top. Very elegant.

    I would prefer a convertible from this era, but this looks like a value proposition regardless. I don’t think prices for the ’61-’66 Thunderbirds are going to tank anytime soon. They seem to have had a steady increase since I started following these cars. Nice find.

    3
  3. Rex Kahrs Member

    Intact?

    1
  4. Tommy Miller

    Body Condition: The body is fairly clean as it’s been garage kept.

    Hmmm… Needs a new vinyl roof has previous rust repair and in one of the pictures the cover has been pulled off and is on the ground behind the car.

    My car has been kept in the garage once or twice too…, but I wouldn’t say it was “garage kept” ;-)

    Thanks for the chuckle!

    That said, we have a 1966 that we “keep” in our garage these days too. This is a nice example of a ’66 T-Bird.

    I agree with ccrvtt about the convertibles. I would love to have one, especially with the roadster kit that makes it look like a two seater. They command a lot more money than the hardtops, but still not too bad for what you get.

    1
  5. Tank

    Those vinyl roof’s usually hide a lot of hurt. They lock in water and just destroy the metal underneath.

  6. Bakyrdhero Member

    My Grandfather had a red one in the 80’s. With broken window regulators, the black leather interior heated up pretty quickly. Nice car though and the seat/steering wheel were fun to play with as a kid.

  7. Maltese Falcon

    “In tack”? Do you mean ‘intact’?

  8. Lyle

    Has anyone gotten what they want for this car from them?

  9. W9BAG Member

    It gives me pause that the speedo is registering about 25 mph, but the car is parked. This was a precision instrument, and if there is corrosion on the spindles, it could be a chore to access. I can just imagine how difficult it might be to remove the instrument panel. This is my favorite body style for the Thunderbird. IMO, it has one the best designed instrument panel of any car ever made. When the chrome is spotless, at night, with the turquoise lighting, it’s fantastic ! Each gauge “pod” is ensconced in chrome, with vertical red needles. And, of course, that massive “thermometer” style speedo if way too cool. Then, I believe that these were the first cars with the sequential rear turn lights. You couldn’t miss them; almost mesmerizing. I saw one one at a car show at the local Moose annual car show. I’ve never seen one before nor since. Red, with black leather, fully loaded, including AM radio/Stereo 8 track player, cruise, and for the piece d’ resistance: it was a retractable hardtop ! 428 engine, and the top of the radiator was polished to the tone of a new…mmm…trombone ! Concourse condition.

    I hope the buyer does a complete restoration of this beautiful car.

  10. PatrickM

    …and no price listed. How about $150.00?

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.