New England Barn Find: 1937 Ford Coupe Deluxe

For fans of barn finds and cars with original patina, this is an amazing car.  Straight trim, no major dents and originality for miles highlight this 1937 Ford Coupe.  It’s for sale here on Craigslist in Bristol, Connecticut with an asking price of $16,000. This car is poised to be a great period hot rod.

Unfortunately there are only a few pictures of the exterior in the ad.  With so few pictures it’s hard to tell if the asking price is reasonable or not.  If you open the hood to find a rebuilt and detailed flathead V8, you could possibly justify the price.  If the engine bay and interior match the exterior, the asking price may be a bit of a stretch.  Either way this is a great looking car and would look great with some modern wheels and tires.

I love the look of these cars.  The integrated headlights in the fenders are a classic design and flow great with the rest of the car.  They look like they are going fast when they are standing still.  So many of these cars have been hacked up and modified, it’s amazing to find one in this original condition.  Hopefully this car will be preserved for what it is.  These cars look great with shiny paint, chrome wheels and billet everything, but those types of cars won’t get as many looks as this one.

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. jw454

    No inside pictures, engine pictures, chassis pictures, trunk pictures. Another lazy seller.

    • AMXSTEVE

      No not lazy, smart, The whole idea of advertising your car is to get the phone ringing.

      • waynard

        And that means you’re going to be gullible enough to believe everything the seller tells you? Bad move. At the very least, a mess of pictures are critical. Better yet a PPI on a vehicle like this.

      • DrinkinGasoline

        waynard….the point being, phone calls lead to conversation which leads to a detailed description. Which leads to a visit. The way vehicles used to be sold, when telephones had a rotary dial.

      • Keith

        What the hell is this “phone” thing you speak of? Who uses that anymore? I’ve sold my last 10-15 cars without ever having a phone conversation. But I think it’s also about the demographic, most of the guys I have buying cars from me are under 40 years old.

    • AMXSTEVE

      you are talking from a buyers side of the sale. As a seller i want to control the sale. If i get a serious buyer i will give him anything he asks for pic wise.
      It weeds out the tire kickers.

      Like 2
      • DrinkinGasoline

        Both the seller and the buyer desire control…
        That’s why it’s called “The Art of the Deal” !
        This is an age old process.

      • DrinkinGasoline

        You would be set back if I walked up your driveway in interest of a vehicle that you had for sale…:) Knowledge is power.

  2. Todd Fitch Staff

    Love the ’37 Ford. Take this car, fix any running and safety concerns (incl. windshield), and drive it as is. When that got boring maybe do more, but let it be a car for a while before it becomes another “completely restored” show piece. Great find, Montana!

    Like 1
  3. JohnD

    Love it just like it is. But it seems to be all there, and with minimal rust why not bring it back to life with a complete restoration? Not hot rodded, but back to new. Okay it would be sweet with a built SBC, performance brakes, and wheels/tires but just don’t cut it up:-)

    Like 2
    • Kevin

      Get off the SBC crap already. Can’t believe you guys and your cannabilizing classic cars.

      Like 2
      • Gary

        What’s SBC????

      • mikethetractorguy

        Gary,

        Small bag of crap.

        Like 2
      • DrinkinGasoline

        Kevin, I agree. Anyone and their mother can build a SBC because they are cheap, easy, accessible, and there are a ton of aftermarket parts available but….. Not everyone can build a flathead with, or without performance parts. I enjoy viewing a well restored or built flathead mill vs. any VIH engine…. any day. Same goes for the original In-line 6’s and 8’s. What I would do though is source a later flatty with a tad more HP. Offy heads, trip Stromberg 97’s, Isky cam and duals with Smithy’s. Back it up with an overdrive trans from around 1951-52. Keep the original engine/trans and rebuild/restore them to stock specs and showcase them in my garage (ready to drop in) next to the glass bowl gas pump.
        Anyone can paint by numbers, but few can paint a masterpiece.

        Like 2
      • DrinkinGasoline

        Gary….Small Block of Carnage.

        Like 1
      • waynard

        Small Block Chevy engine, Gary.

      • KEN TILLY Member

        Well said Kevin.
        Why, why, why would anybody of sane mind even THINK about hot rodding such an ORIGINAL coupe? How many of these are there still on the road in the States in original condition compared to those that have been rodded? Leave it as it is, apart from a decent paint job, and enjoy it for what it is. As for the brakes, I owned a 1934 Austin Ten in South Africa for 28 years, did many thousands of miles with it and as long as the cable brakes were maintained they were perfectly adequate for modern day traffic conditions. I just wish this ’37 were mine, although the narrow roads here in UK would be a bit of a challenge.

      • JohnD

        I get where you’re coming from, but it’s a good thing we don’t all think like that. I like original classics too, but the world’s a better place with the “little deuce coupes” as well.

      • Keith

        Dropping a SBC in a 37 Ford? I think that’s a mandatory 10 years in Riker’s.

        Like 2
  4. jeff6599

    Yep, no seat belts, bias ply tires, 6 volts, mechanical brakes, vacuum wipers, etc.

    All sure to make for a comfortable relaxing drive. Oh it won’t get boring; you’ll need 3 coffees when you arrive. Why do people make foolish statements to drive it as it is? Sure, if it is a ’70! But not an antique.

    • Darrel

      You forget to mention that it doesnt have airbags, anti lock brakes, or reverse camera/sensors either… Thats the beauty of being an American. You’re entitled to your own opinion…. ;)

      Like 1
    • DrinkinGasoline

      People make those statements because they know “how” to drive them. There are not many folks around anymore who know how to crank a Model T properly without breaking their thumb, wrist or arm, let alone know how to drive them. At 56 years old, I’m proud to say that I can. My ’49 DeSoto is all original and she starts on the third rotation and scoots along just fine with 6 volt and no power steering as well as being fully capable of keeping up with 65 mph traffic on the Interstate. Her radio still proudly plays AM through the single dash speaker and her clock still keeps time within 2 minutes, give or take.
      One must understand and respect a vehicle for what it is, in order to operate it, maintain it, and enjoy it. I’ve been fortunate enough to have been exposed to everything from a 24 Ford TT truck, up to today’s vehicles, as well as heavy equipment and I respect them for what they are and operate them as such.

      Like 1
      • Keith

        Well said, sir. I was rolling a 46 Hudson a few years back, people thought I was nuts, but once I got the hang of it and it’s Drive-Master trans, and made it road worthy, it was nice to drive. Just not on the interstate.

        Like 1
    • KEN TILLY Member

      Jeff6599.
      Nothing foolish at all about driving a ROADWORTHY old car. Treat it as an old car and there will be no problem. Seat belts yes. Radial ply tyres, Yes. Nothing wrong with vacuum wipers or mechanical brakes if properly maintained. A lot more foolish are the people that want to make a genuine antique auto into a hot rod.

      Like 1
      • jeff6599

        Ken, nothing wrong at all. But those who comment about making a daily driver out of a genuine antique that won’t come close to being sane in today’s traffic situations alarm me. Using it sparingly as is to sneak out for a quiet drive to an ice cream shop or steak house is more in tune with reality.

  5. DrinkinGasoline

    If it were to be driven as is, one would not go far or for any length of time. You have to “actually drive” these vehicles and not just sit back and finger steer it or just touch to brake pedal to stop. I do love this car but it would need some upgrading to make it safer on today’s roads as well as more enjoyable for longer cruising. Beef up the Flatty, upgrade the brakes and do a minimalistic power steering set up all while keeping the rest of it as stock as possible. I’m not one for patina because in most cases, it’s just rust so I would block it out and paint it. Then IMO, you would have an enjoyable Ford while keeping with the period.

  6. Steve

    It’s priced about twice what it’s worth, IMO. I looked at a nicely restored 37 coupe like this recently, prices a $15k. It wasn’t perfect, but a really nice car, restored to original specs.

    Like 1
    • Keith

      Part of that is location, Steve. Up here in the northeast, we don’t see cars that old that rust-free. It is probably priced a bit high, but I would expect it to sell around $13k up here.

  7. geomechs geomechs Member

    Original and complete, rust free, and—-STRAIGHT? If it’s got the original motor it might be stretching it but if would be worth the price. The original motor would be quite the find. 1937 was the first year Ford moved the water outlets to the center of the heads and the water pumps down onto the block. Domed pistons for the first time as well. If it was a genuine motor it would also have 18mm spark plugs. The Stromberg 97 carburetor was also new for ’37.

    Definitely a restoration would be in order sometime down the road. I’d get it running, tuned up, brakes adjusted and have a good time with it. Contrary to popular belief mechanical brakes aren’t that hard to deal with, as long as they’re kept in good order and the cables and linkage is properly adjusted. One big advantage is that should you break an axle (something those old Fords tended to do) you still have your front end brakes to help you stop. I’ve got a good friend who owns a ’37 4-door and the mechs saved his life.

    • Kevin

      Also the first year for the smaller 60HP version

      • geomechs geomechs Member

        Hi Kevin. Yes, the venerable V8-60. I understand that it was Henry’s answer to the mounting requests for a more economical six. Henry hated six cylinder motors, probably a throw back to the Model K thirty years before that. The 60 became popular in Midget racers and boats although I sometimes wonder if it was to power the latter or just used as the anchor. It cost Ford as much to build a 60 as it did an 85. There’s a guy, used to drive a ’37 Std. coupe with a 60 in local rallies. He said it was OK as long as you got a good head start on the hills. In the western prairies most of the 60’s got pulled and replaced with 85’s because the 60 just couldn’t hold up against our famous Chinook winds.

        Like 1
    • Jim Engliah

      … Geo, I am absolutely on your page. I am an old school person. I really appreciate antique automobiles that are in this condition that were left alone without even a first time restoration. This ’37 Ford coupe is like a ” time capsule ” from the past eight decades. To look at it as it sits untouched with age from it’s factory completion just makes this car 100% worthy not to change a thing outside of seat belts and turn signals. And yes, the original motor would be a big plus. The listed price could maybe have been lower, … but you have to take in consideration that it’s a historical car that hasn’t been butchered up. It’s really up to a buyer’s overwhelming ” desire ” to want and likes what he sees due to the decent shape this beauty is in.

  8. Rodney

    Short of the cataracted windshield, this look just amazing.

    Like 1
  9. Bob

    I love these old Fords, probably more because that was what I drove when I was young. I had a 34, and a 38 Ford with mechanical brakes, and they were no problem to keep properly adjusted.
    They are not fast, but driven sensibly, they are reasonably reliable.

    • Kevin

      Not fast by today’s standards, but they ruled the roost in their day. And actually they can be made into a respectable performer. There’s a wide variety of performance parts available for the Flathead

  10. Rustytech Member

    It appears to be a nice solid Ford, but if your going to do anymore than just a minor upgrade, your going to be upside down quickly at this price. I would put current price at about 1/2 the asking price.

    Like 1
    • waynard

      You’ll be upside down no matter how much you do to improve its operation. That really isn’t the point though. It’s not always about money.

      Like 1
  11. John Taylor

    I think he is asking top end money for it when you consider what it will cost to just fix the rust issues and other stuff there, suddenly you’ll be into some serious dollars

  12. Dusty Stalz

    This car deserves to be a classic street rod. Not “cut up” but upgraded with a more modern FORD drivetrain, suspension and brakes. I’d keep it looking mostly stock with painted rims w nice caps and rings and stock bumpers. I’d also paint it a stock color from 37. Stockers are nice and all, but I’d want to be able to drive this in modern traffic scenarios.

  13. Larry Kniveton

    I’ve been lurking on this site for months and months. really enjoy it. I wish I could put an end to the relentlessly boring and narrow “bad photo” comments. But I’m sure I can’t. Here’s the thing fellas, and listen up please ’cause I’m tired of weeding through those predictable posts. The real life fact is that most folks SIMPLY DON’T UNDERSTAND, they just don’t know. And that statement can be cast across the entire spectrum of life. There are no hidden agendas, there is no flim flam, there is no bait and switch. Aside from aficionados and sales professionals the general public does not even conceive of what it means to properly present a product for sale. Lousy photos and one line descriptions are a way of life. Phuleeze, ditch the gripping and spend your time writing something constructive.

    Like 1
    • C Carl

      My favorite bad pic ad. This pic got over 30 calls.
      64 Dodge Polara, $7900

      Like 1
    • Keith

      I think even the dimmest of wits understands that to sell a car, you should at least have a photo of the interior and engine bay. My favorite ads are the ones that have 1 photo of a car, and it’s not the car for sale “but my car looks like the one in the picture.” Or the infamous single pic of a car with a tarp over it, and the only description is “call”. Gotta love those.

  14. John

    I have sold many things in life, vehicles, parts etc. I have found that it is best to describe something as much as possible in the ad (including plenty of pics) so as to weed out the tire kicker calls, that way when I do receive a call it is usually someone that is a serious buyer. And if they ask a question that I didn’t answer in the ad I go back and put that answer in (if they don’t buy the item). And I semi-restored a 40 ford coupe with the original 85hp. flathead, it had plenty of power. Had to use oversize pistons as the block was rebuilt before. Didn’t do any cutting. Wish I still had it!

  15. Bob

    I live in the west and have been playing with cars since the late 1950s, and even though I have been looking for one, I still have not seen a V8 60. Maybe they didn’t sell many of them in the mountains.

    • Kevin

      There was actually quite a few of them built, but they had a short run, as ’40 was the last year. I think building a 60 nowadays might be quite challenging, as parts suppliers mainly cater to the 85.

  16. Loco Mikado

    Apparently nobody read the ad. It has an 85hp V8 and comes with another rebuilt ’37 engine.

  17. PAPERBKWRITER

    Great looking car and something that deserves attention…What the buyers does with it is his business. Lots of opinions about keeping it original but IMO getting it back on the road is what it needs, however its done.

    Like 1
  18. Dave S.

    This would make a great hotrod ! lol

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