Numbers Matching Tetanus Shot: 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Convertible

How many times have you looked at a car and wished that you could have found it so much sooner? Looking at this 1968 Chevrolet Camaro convertible makes me think exactly that. In rough shape, and an ambitious restoration, there are some plus sides to this sad old convertible. Bidding has currently reached $3,800. Find it here on ebay out of Agawam, Massachusetts.

The good news about this Camaro is that it is a numbers matching car. Equipped with a 327, and an automatic, the engine bay looks like an entirely different car than what it is attached to. Although numbers matching, no information is given about the drivetrains condition. If you were to consider restoring this Chevy, at least it is a numbers matching car.

Although the interior is dirty, it doesn’t look terrible, not to say that any of it is really suitable for a restored vehicle. Perhaps the dash, the seat frames, and some other items may be of use.  The convertible top is completely shredded and missing, which was surely part of the downfall to this barn stored Camaro. Although the Massachusetts weather didn’t do it any favors either.

Needing everything and the kitchen sink, this Camaro would need a brave soul that would be up to the challenge of restoring this car. The biggest concerns are the rotted frame rails, and the rotted floors. Looking at the exterior, the rockers, quarters, and fenders are toast. It is always tragic to see cars end up this way, but I suppose there are some useful parts on this one, or for the determined person a restoration candidate. What cars have you seen that you wish you could have found sooner?

 

 

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Comments

  1. Vin in NJ

    What’s up with the sign post running across the back of the car and through the rear fenders?

    Like 2
    • Joe Nose

      its the only thing holding up the gas tank…

      Like 1
    • Mike

      There’s a pipe running through the car just ahead of the rear wheel well too.
      The combination of the two might be the only things keeping the ass end of the car from sitting on the ground! They pass through the car right around the position where the front and rear spring perches are.

      • mark

        I noticed that too?!?! Probably reinforcing the body/frame!

      • Howard

        Right, I’m guessing the springs are attached to the sign posts.

  2. Gunner

    Looks like they put this one out to pasture, literally. Lots of rust, and a whole lotta money needed. Yeah, pass…….

    Like 1
  3. 68 custom

    way too gone, doesn’t even look like a good parts car. shame for a 68 vert to end up like this…

    Like 2
  4. Cuda Dude 69

    “run run forrest…runnnnnnn!!!!”

    Like 1
  5. Squanto

    The only matching numbers are the license plates.

    Like 2
  6. doug6423

    I’m sure the VIN and mechanicals will transferred to a new donor and be a matching numbers road worthy car again.

    Like 1
  7. Adam T45 Staff

    Is it just me, or on top of everything else does it look like the steering wheel and column are sitting at a really strange angle?

    Like 1
  8. Dave Member

    Gawd, I saw that pipe before the rear wheel, I thought at first it was a hokey exhaust but alas…

    • gbvette62

      That was exactly my first thought. It looks like a VIN tag, waiting for a Dynacorn body!

      • Vin in NJ

        Would probably still need a frame

  9. Dolphin Member

    Ouch!
    Life is too short for this car….for me anyway.

  10. Tom Hall

    “Numbers Matching Tetanus Shot” – laugh of the day!

  11. AMXSTEVE

    Did they find this at the bottom of a lake?

    This is EXACTLY what I was talking about when everyone was complaining about a $4500 Gremlin.

    You have to be joking, is a vin worth 5 grand?

    Like 1
  12. Mike

    They sell everything to fix this car.anyone with some welding talent and patience could have a nice car.I could probably get it welded back together in under a month.

  13. Paul

    The sign post going through the side markers in the rear of the car is most likely there because it is holding the rear spring shackles because the frame rails and trunk floor are gone.

  14. Mike

    In 1983 living in Syracuse (Zero-cuse) NY in the snow belt, I bought a 4 door 57 chevy that was in much worse shape and with the help of a bunch of street signs, replaced the floor boards and drove the thing to school in 11th and 12th grade. Be careful shutting the doors, I’d say. Sometimes the cracked bondo would release a 608 inch sheet of rusty metal from a random section of the car. The rocker panels were long gone, post between the doors hung unattached to anything, and the floors were gone from firewall to middle of the rear seat! It was truly a Flinstone mobile that I barely resurrected enough to pass inspection. But at 17 years old, I loved that thing like it was a rolls royce…

  15. Mike

    release a 6 – 8 inch piece of sheet metal from the body somewhere… is what I meant (not 608)

  16. Jeffro

    I refuse to even use a smart a$$ remark on this.

  17. G.P. Member

    I can sure understand why they don’t want it.

  18. Rocko

    This reminds me of a friend that had a Duster that he called a toaster, was so rotted that the trunk lid latch held up the rear. He kept 4 spares in the trunk pressed against the trunk lid to keep the rear spring perches in place .Drove it that way for years.

  19. Allan

    The really sad part of this visual nightmare is the other Camaro sitting in the background, slowly collecting dust….

    Like 2
  20. JagManBill

    VIN in NJ – the only frame under this is the front rails holding the engine and suspension – rest of it is all uni-body. 68 new shell from Dyna or several others is around $14k shipped to your door. That front sub-frame assy is only an add’l $1k. So for $15k you too can have a brand new 68 Camaro* roller…

    *Some assembly required…

    Like 1

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