Pete’s Place: Massive Stash In Pennsylvania

Right now, in the Eastern part of Pennsylvania, lies about 8 acres of vintage tin, some of which is being reclaimed by Mother Nature, most of which is still salvageable, but all can be for sale for the right money. I call it “Pete’s Place” because elderly owner Pete has requested that I not divulge information that would reveal its actual address location. Suffice it to say that it’s in a rural location, and you need good strong clothing, a spirit of automotive adventure, and no fear of insects to see it all. Let me show you more of this treasure trove…

Pete’s Place is an interesting mix of old emergency vehicles, lots of parts, an impressive collection of old radio-communication and electronics equipment, a bunch of random older vehicles, a few tow trucks, and a more than a few Packards (including a Clipper hearse), the nicest of which is a fully-restored Caribbean that once belonged to a Governor of Pennsylvania.

Starting in the late 1960s, Pete bought, re-sold, reconditioned and serviced police cars. He and a small crew did this all up until around 2005 when he scaled back his business for reasons which he hasn’t shared with me. Nowadays, he and his business partner buy and sell a vehicle or two, here and there, including some newer Police units and regular cars, but not nearly the volume compared to the heady days. He’s still an astute, intelligent man and talented dealmaker, with an enduring love for his wife and a soft spot for rescued German Shepherds. He has a sense of humor, but he doesn’t take guff or rudeness from anyone. He truly has “seen a thing or two” in his day, does “know what he has” and won’t be “taken for a ride”

I firmly believe in recording oral histories from people like Pete. He’s a wealth of information and experience and can tell you at least one fact about every single vehicle on his property. Every time I have been to his place, I have learned something new, however small and inconsequential it may be in the grand scheme of things.

Rather than blabber on and on about each individual car on the property, let me just show you some of the pictures which I have taken there over a course of three years and four different visits. This is less than half of what Pete has at his place, so please check out the pictures and let your imagination run wild! Oh, and if you’re interested to inquire about one of his many vehicles, he can be reached by email here.

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Comments

  1. Chebby Staff

    What I’ve never understood about hoarder dudes is, none of them seem to be wealthy, but they spend a fair amount of money to bring home hundreds of vehicles that just sit around and rot. And since they never sell, the investment factor is nil.

    Like 57
    • TJohnson

      Agree wholeheartedly was Chebby. I know a guy who bought up a ton of old 40’s and 50’s Packard’s and 40’s- 70 Cadillacs starting probably in the seventies. A lot of The Cadillacs were convertibles mostly in the sixties. He has a 56 and a 60 Seville, all these cars sitting out in a field rotting away. He did spend some good money on the cars at the time but was worried about people shooting out the windows and roll most of them down before you park them. You can only imagine what they look like now.

      Like 22
      • Cattoo Member

        Well they could still be shot out just by putting a bullet through the sheet metal of the door. Wonder how many were shot out considering his preventive measures.

    • Pete

      Well there certainly is something to be said for your thoughts. I don’t consider myself a “hoarder” but rather a saver as a good many of the vehicles here were saved from the crusher. Several of the Packards were in fact gifts from other salvage yard operators and folks who just did not want to see them scrapped. Yep they are rotting here but they have not been turned into new Toyotas and some do leave for a new life. A 66 Lincoln left last Saturday.

      Like 19
      • Bill McCoskey

        I’ve known Pete and his business associate G. W. for going on 40 years. For every car you see today, there are likely 50 or more cars he’s saved/owned or restored, and unlike a typical hoarder most cars are for sale.

        Like many people who collect old vehicles, he can seem a bit eccentric at times [like myself], but when it comes to cars like Packards, Studebakers, big Chryslers, emergency vehicles & taxicabs, and unusual cars in general, he’s very knowledgeable. If I had to guess, I would say in the last half a century he’s saved hundreds of vehicles from the crusher.

        [Hi Pete]

        Like 18
      • keith

        Hello i just stumbled on this article and i am very interested in one of the cars. IMG_6667 is the second car shown in the article. it appears to be a Hearst. it is black and you can see the red truck with the white grill in the background to the right side of the car.

        can yuo tell me about it? thank you for saving these car.. I applaud you

    • Jim V

      I don’t think the guy was a hoarder, I think he’s a businessman. In order to have a successful business, you have to have inventory, not too hard to understand that.

    • Gary

      I agree and it pisses me off cause I would love to work on one. There is a guy up here in Oregon that has 17 Cads all rusting away, 1937 and earlier, you ask and he says he’s gonna do something with them, now they are to far gone.

      Like 1
  2. PaulG

    I’m in the “Enjoy these characters like Pete camp” while they’re still around.
    Really the cars are a secondary reason to visit a guy like this.
    Miss the amazing older guy’s (characters) I had the pleasure of knowing…

    Like 23
    • Pete

      Thanks Pete

      Like 8
  3. JPon

    I have known Pete for years and nothing is ever really for sale, time has taken its toll, was there a few weeks ago, stuff parked in the same places as 20 years ago, he is a great guy and a wealth of information, but alas the collection will sit there forever untouched and unmoved and unsold

    Like 6
    • Pete

      Not quite the facts much is for sale now and more coming up. The time clock is ticking.

      Like 9
  4. Steve R

    When I see the phrases, “all can be for sale for the right money”, “knows what he has” and “won’t be taken for a ride”. I instantly think, everything is overpriced. If he’s been doing this since the 1960’s and many of the cars shown in the write up have likely been there nearly as long, that means he doesn’t like to sell or only does so when he gets top dollar. The state will eventually get many of these car, and he’ll wind up paying, one way or another.

    Steve R

    Like 31
    • Pete

      More like cars and trucks for sale for fair money. Not to worry the state will not get it there is a plan in place. Thank you for your comments but you assuming without fact checking.

      Like 11
  5. Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

    Pete sounds like a well-grounded man in my book-still in love with his wife and a soft spot for rescued GSD’s.There’s a guy that knows more than he’s telling, with tales that are incredulous and genuine without the testosterone embellishments we too often hear when those types of stories are told by others.
    You’re a smart and fortunate man to have a friend like that, Russell. They’re too few and far between these days..

    Like 14
    • Pete

      Thank for seeing the true picture. Pete

      Like 5
  6. don

    I love old junkyards , but In all honesty most of this should have been crushed out when steel prices were high a few years ago . Old buses , junky box trucks , rotted out mid 70s Caddy ambulances and stripped out beat up cruisers with no drivetrains aren’t worth a heck of a lot and never will . The earlier Ambulances and hearses here are only good for their trim and lights ; most ambulances and hearses are well maintained, so people who collect them usually have good cars to start with and have no need for a rotted carcass . The early 50s four door sedans that sit here are the same way; I cant see anyone pouring money into restoring one of these , just trim parts and they aren’t particularly rare . It also seems like every old time yard saves Packards and Studebakers , but its a limited market, and unless they are rare (like the Packard ambulance and 66 Lark ) , they will just rust away like these have. The only ones that caught my eye was the Checker cab and the 74 Dodge Royal Monaco -that is a complete looking former cruiser and is the same model as the Blues Brothers car -he wont have problems selling that !

    Like 17
  7. Bill Shields

    I think saying Pete’s taste was “eclectic” would be a massive understatement!!
    Still, the brown 77 Royal Monaco sedan caught my attention.
    Big soft spot for those cars

    Like 2
    • Pete

      The 77 Monacos are here waiting for a qualified restorer not the domo derby guy (of which there have been many). I have been buying and selling all forms of cop cars since 1963 at the moment we even have a 17 Taurus with 550 miles for sale damaged but repairable runs.

      Like 6
  8. Howard A Member

    Make way for the Hammel 950,, gotta admit, it does a nice job,
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sndw9toP2Sk

    Like 5
  9. Mountainwoodie

    Well its all been said….damn shame…..not sure what the point is to allow them to rot into the ground.

    I think I saw a ’61 bubbletop Pontiac…….somebody on the East Coast needs to get that one, if the earth will give it up and its not swiss cheese by now.

    Like 6
    • Pete

      The 61 Bubble top is not mine it is a friend and customers and yes it is rotting and numerous folks have wanted to buy it. The owner says not for sale Hoarder????

      Like 3
  10. Evan

    Nope, sorry. No sympathy. If “you know what it’s worth”, put a price tag on it and sell it for that money and no less. Pete might have interesting stories to tell, but he’s either playing silly games or has an overly high opinion of his vehicles.

    Like 13
    • Pete

      No games its for sale no silly prices beauty in the eyes of the beholder. I know whats here and don’t want to crush it. The problem is one persons silly price is anothers fair price.

      Like 7
  11. h5mind

    I have known several “Petes” in my time. The New England region seems to have a particular infestation of them. I’m sure the fellow is a hoot to chat with, but hoarding is a sign of mental issues, much like poor personal hygiene. On the other hand, there is nothing quite as humbling as offering up what you ‘thought’ were valuable possessions to discover that most people just aren’t interested.

    Like 11
    • Pete

      Yep always said I was crazy must have been when I started collecting Packards in the late 50s. Hey running driving 37 V12 for $300.00 41 Buick Roadmaster four door convertible for $300.00 drove it home from New York those were the days to hoard. So I have always been nuts and yes I do shower regularly. As far as interested the scrap folks always are.

      Like 6
  12. Jay E.

    Its really in the eye of the beholder isn’t it? As hard as I found it to get rid of a stash of cars like this on a property I bought, I cant really visualize with the idea that there is value here. In many cases you will pay to remove old cars like this, so thinking you know what you have and what they are worth is great until the market steps in. Now you cant even scrap a car unless you have a title, fluids and Freon drained and tires. I don’t see opportunity here, just a nightmare. My experience was that if someone came to look at a car, be SURE they left with it, regardless of price. Anything is better than paying to have it removed. Disposing of “treasures” like this, I’ll never, ever do that again

    Like 5
    • Pete

      Well last week we scrapped three loads of nine each. There was only one OLD car a 51 Packard that deserved to go. the rest 99 to 08. Still don’t like scrapping but you gotta make room.

      Like 3
  13. Rex Kahrs Member

    If Pete “knows what he’s got”, then why on earth didn’t he try to take care of it?

    Yeah, I know what Pete’s got too…a bunch of rodent-infested rusty cars that nobody wants. Sorry if that’s harsh, but we see this kind of thing all the time; and usually the guy is abrasive and unrealistic, and the product is too far gone.
    I didn’t see one vehicle of interest, except the Renault Caravelle, which came from the factory as a junk car!

    Like 5
    • Pete

      Yeah well the Renault Caravelle was brought here at the request of my MD. doctor cause his son left it when went off the College and I was asked not to scrap it. Think its time??

      Like 4
  14. Gaspumpchas

    Everything true, Guys–all this stuff laying on the ground with wet leaves all over it? Might be some parts cars in there, but wait- the guy knows what he’s got…good luck like one of the guys said even scrap value is in the dumper.

    Cheers
    GPC

    Like 3
    • Pete

      Yeah well several years ago when scrap was in the clouds we dumped about 30 grands worth. When it goes up again it moves on. Or???

      Like 4
  15. michael h streuly

    Nothing but a field of junk. Pete has serious mental illness issues. Get help.

    Like 1
  16. Pete

    Always said I was nuts have a great day.

    Like 7
    • Howard A Member

      Hi Pete, sorry about the “shredder” comment. There’s always an inherent risk, the seller may be tuning in. Personally, I don’t think you’re nuts, some people collect door knobs, you, having the resources, collected cars.Many I’m sure would have gone to the shredder, had you not taken them. The problem is, today, fewer and fewer people will have the same interests as you, and people, for whatever reason, are spending wads of cash on these showroom condition beauties from auctions, and less and less are restoring cars. Can’t blame them, really, restoring a car today is a never ending goose chase, and disappointments. With a few exceptions, nobody is going to restore a M code Plymouth or half an ambulance. The interest just isn’t there anymore.

      Like 6
      • Pete

        I have to agree with you on some points.However lots of folks need parts to complete restorations on others. Interest is fading in ALL collectables today everybody looks at their phone and plays games. Just wait 30 years from now if there are car shows they will be static displays as todays computer controlled cars will have failed is some area and there will be no computers sensors boxes etc to keep em going. Today if you can buy a good original or restored car of your interest there is no way you can restore one for the same price. Yesterdays $500.00 convertible top is todays $4000.00 top. In 20 years there will be almost no yards left like mine (mine included) cause no one will be interested in anything the might have except scrap yards. Today to properly restore even a plain sedan will go 40k if you just pay a shop.

        Like 5
  17. JimmyinTEXAS

    Pete seems like a real character and to meet him would be a learning experience for sure. From the pictures, this seems less like a collection than someone just amassing something that gives them pleasure and has no way to protect the investment and some of it has turned into scrap. Russell is helping him salvage what hasn’t been diminished to scrap.

    Like 3
    • Joe

      For Pete’s sake, cool collection. You know what they say “rust never sleeps”

      Like 1
  18. Pete

    Repeat my above comment guess system burped!

    Like 1
    • Pete

      Thanks Jimmy think you said a lot Pete

      Like 1
  19. anthony getty

    First off all the people that are complaining up above id just like to say these kinds of places are my favorite kind of place to check out especially because he seems to have a lot of the bizarre cars such as the emergency vehicles that you don’t see very often my only question is are there any German or Italian or European cars (or bikes) in the collection.

    Like 1
    • Pete

      Almost NO foreign never had much time for them. Today have a couple of Audi A8s for daily drivers neat cars V/8s all wheel drive and not steel but aluminum. Still like a late Crown Vic for a beater.

      Like 2
  20. 71FXSuperGlide

    Is that red/white Packard a ’55 Patrician? Wasn’t used for fire duty, was it?

    Like 1
  21. Mark Imbesi

    Love the ’66 Lincoln Continental Convertible, I am looking for a friend for a 65-4 Lincoln Trunk deck any chance?

    Like 1
    • Pete

      Sorry no got Pete

  22. John

    That’s what is called a junk yard, because literally almost everything there is junk. I’m glad he knows what he has. LOL!

  23. Gary Hunley

    You are so right, they just sit and rot when someone like me would love the chance to bring one back to life!

    Like 1
    • Pete

      Most here for sale come on down. Pete

      Like 2
  24. IkeyHeyman

    I grew up in eastern PA, if you go there to check anything out, don’t go gallivanting around in shorts and sneakers – it’s rattlesnake and black widow country.

    Like 1
    • Tom Member

      Yikes! I’m out. Not afraid to say I am not a fan of “Spiders and Snakes”. Think there is a song about that!

      I just want to thank Pete for NOT collecting rare Big Block Muscle Cars that might have been allowed to become one with the earth!

      • Pete

        We did how about 69 Fairlane light weight. GTO Judge.427 Vette Super Bee and many more all been here and gone.

  25. mike D

    while some may be interesting, let’s face it, they are beat … you could probably find any of them at an estate sale, in much better shape I dare say, those that have been ” setting” there for years upon years would require a complete make over.. and what would you have? a mid 80s Dodge cop car which I have heard of late, is not worth the effort I did look twice at that 80 New Yorker but sadly, up to its door handles in leaves … he can let them go now ” dirt cheap” or after he passes scrappers will show up and haul them away

    Like 2
  26. George

    Too bad there’s no windshield in the Book Mobile. The dogs would have loved that converted into a camper.

  27. Marty Member

    Rant: Somebody hold my beer.

    What am I reading here? What happened to all the car guys? Gigantic collections left outdoors to rust has been a part of the automotive lexicon since the beginning. What changed? There has never, ever been a warm, heated, loving garage waiting somewhere to receive each and every car ever made. Not all of them are ever intended to survive. About 99% of the rest of them aren’t rusting away somewhere, because they’re no longer in existence. They’re rebar now. While I agree parts value is minimal, and potential restoration projects even less so, what happened to loving old cars just because they were old cars? Maybe just me, but I still like seeing them. Stop hating on the guy who bought so many and was not able to keep every one of them indoors.

    It’s naive to assume that a bunch of “perfectly good cars” were all left outside to rot. Try and remember why many of them were there in the first place. Lots of older salvage yards…what they did was salvage junk cars, for crying out loud. Sometimes the cars sat there long enough to become old, interesting, and even scarce collector’s items, but it’s erroneous to assume that was the intent from the beginning. Cut the guy some slack. And the first one of us who ever owned a project car that we were able to get to exactly as planned and exactly when we expected to- can cast the first stone.

    Junk cars sitting outside is a fact of life. Deal with it. Or go subscribe to rareshinynewlookingcarsinclimatecontrolledgarages.com or something.

    Like 17
    • Howard A Member

      I hear your frustration, and I feel the same way, but I’ll tell you what happened, most of the people that would want these cars are passing away, today, most can’t tell a 1/2 inch wrench from a 9/16, ( or a 13mm from a 14mm) but they sure can come up with tens of thousands to get a nice one somehow. 20 years ago, Pete would have his hands full of buyers, Jeff too with that collection he’s dispersing, but it’s falling on deaf ears today. Just remember, when it comes to the old car hobby, WE had it made and future generations will never have the fun we had, they simply can’t afford to.

      Like 3
    • Pete

      A big 10-4 to all you said thanks

      Like 3
  28. Macon Michaux

    Yep, it’s a free country. Glad someone is still able to do what they want, with what they want, on their own durn property. Good on Pete.

    Like 4
  29. Pete

    Wekk said Pete

  30. TJohnson

    Pete, I take back what I said earlier. If you saved the cars from the crusher, then my hats off to you! Unfortunately, the man I know bought most of his cars running and driving and just parked them.

    P.S. I am sure you have a ton of great stories of cars you’ve found over the years!

    Like 4
  31. Qabbott

    That 1966 Studebaker Cruiser looks pretty good. Rare to see a Cruiser with the optional vinyl roof that was standard on the Daytona. Is it a V8?

    • Pete

      Cruiser is a V/8 and top was an option this one came right from original owner in South Bend

      Like 2
  32. Rex Kahrs Member

    I take back what I said too. I get it. Pete spent years buying and selling and parting cars, and the good stuff cycled in and out, and the rest he kept for parts.
    So now he’s clearing things out.

    Hats off to Pete for not taking umbrage to the comments, that shows a lot of character. We are a surly bunch.

    Like 4
  33. Gary Hunley

    Wouldn’t mind one of the older Ambulances! But have 0 $$ to get it with and even less to ship. :)

  34. Mitch Ross Member

    The 66 Stude has a high roof, I’d love to know the story on that. The 77 or 78 Dodge RCMP car is worth restoring, as is the Royal Monaco. Not the Bluesmobile, but more like the cars chasing it in the movie. The P70 Crown Vic is getting rarer. I have 7 of them. I’d love to see the place. I’m still looking for a genuine Dodge Taxi from the 70s.

    Like 1
  35. Sarah Gath

    I have to love how many people here are talking about they have “known so many Petes before and…”

    Look, unless you know this man you’re all assuming way too much here. I happen to know Pete, and he has done more for the antique radio & car hobbies than most ever will get a chance to. Not only was he one of the original founders of the Professional Car Society, but he has single handedly saved countless cars that simply would not exist today if not for him. He collection even has a few sole-surviving examples, that if they hadn’t been parked on his property, would have been long-since crushed like all the others of their kind that had been made.

    He doesn’t negotiate much on his prices because his prices are reasonable. I think a lot of people would do well to realize that, when you’re looking for something truly difficult to find, where there’s not many left to where it is rare to even see one on the market, if the price is reasonable you’re probably better off paying instead of offending your only lead on the item for a few dollars off. And if that price isn’t one you like, what about a “Thank you for your time” and leaving on good terms? Then maybe the next time a consensus on the price can be had on something else.

    Like 7
    • Pete

      Thank you. Pete

    • Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

      Eloquently put, Sarah Gath and 100% on target.

  36. Howard A Member

    I think there’s a lesson to be learned here, the seller may be listening in. This Barn Finds thing may be bigger than we thought.

    Like 2
    • Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

      I think the other lesson to be learned here is that though we may know something of our subject matter, maybe we all on occasion fall back onto typical human behavior of not really investigating the global surround before we jump to a conclusion brought on by our tunnel vision.
      Kinda like folks do when they see something on the “social media” that gets all kinds of hype before checking into the rest of the facts surrounding the incident.

      Like 4
    • Pete

      Better believe BIGGER than we thought I am buried under Emails.

      Like 1
  37. Rex Kahrs Member

    Here here Nevada! Too much of that social media crap and stupidity trumps intelligence!

    Like 1
    • '59fordFAN

      Couldn’t you have chosen a different verb, Mr. Kars? Lol!

  38. Earl L Nelson Jr

    I can tell you from personal experience Pete is the guy I wanted to be all my life. Never was able to be. But that late 80’s Caprice Pa Trooper Patrol car He won’t part with. I wanted it Badly. But I did score a 96 Federal 6 Door Funeral Limousine from his collection.

    Like 3
  39. Glenn

    Pete your one great car guy! I congratulate and thank you for being you! That 51 Packard hearse with the curved back window needs to be saved, also is that 51 Packard limo parked out side the gate a driver? Id love to spend a day there and get to visit with you!

    Like 1
  40. the one

    Well, their not called “junk yards” for nothing y’know…

    Like 2
  41. Andrew Taylor

    Well Pete, the Checker Model A-11 certainly got my attention….

    I guess Im a old car horder too….I suffer from C.O.P.D

    “Checker obsessive possesion disorder

    Like 5
    • Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

      Understandable, Andrew Taylor-many of us suffer a similar issue, A.D.O.S. (Attention Deficit:OH! SHINY!)

      Like 1
    • Pete

      This Checker has a great history used from new by DEA in NYC has rear AC and hi pro 350.

      Like 2
  42. Stevieg

    To all of you who are fortunate enough to know Pete, I envy you. I had a mentor in my life, my Pete, who passed away. He owned the hearse dealership I worked at. Left me some money and a nice 1969 Cadillac convertible. I’d rather be broke & walking everywhere and have Walter back. Pete, thank you for saving these cars, whether they are restorable or just parts cars. And thank you for being you. I wish I had the chance to shake your hand!

    Like 1
  43. Miguel

    When I see old cars I feel the need to save it. For me old cars are not an intellectual exercise, it is a feeling.

    I can’t fault Pete for having so many cars as at one time I had over 100 myself.

    I never had the property to store them though. Renting a storage yard gets to be expensive.

    I wish I had a property where 40 years later I can still go out there and see cars I had picked up and remember the story of that car.

    If you don’t have a feeling or a desire to save old cars, you are in the wrong place.

    I don’t understand the negative comments above. Every car we all have has been saved by somebody. Does it make any difference if that particular guy saved one car or 100?

    Like 1
  44. Pete

    Thanks Pete

  45. Paul S

    I found the mid 1970s Dodge Ambulance the most interesting. My father had a 1975 Dodge Tradesman All Window Long Van with the same color scheme. Beige over Orange. I remember he bought it from a curtain store around 1977. It had curtains mounted in all the back windows. We called it the Creamsicle. Of course there were no lights on the roof or any ambulance badging. It had the 318 engine in it. I remember using it around December 1987 to move from a house I sold to another house. So we had it a long time. The rocker panels started to rust, he could not get it through the NJ inspection so he pop riveted some sheet metal over the holes and then it passed. He finally sold it in 1988 somewhere around Freehold, NJ. That was the only van I ever saw with that color scheme until now.

    • Paul S

      Only picture I found from September 1986 while taking pictures of my totaled 1971 Olds 88, the van is in the background.

      Like 1
  46. '59fordFAN

    Oh and, love the RCMP Mopar; wonder, how it got, down, to PA?

  47. Paul S

    After doing my tax returns this year I may consider buying it and converting it to a mobile home.

  48. Harry

    Thanks for saving these Pete. Sent you an email about selling some.

    Like 1
  49. stephen

    PETER W GRAVE”,they only bury you in one”,is the only living original owner of a 1956 Packard. His stories are legend to be sure and none of his truly better cars were ever be seen on here.Sadly the climate where he lives has taken a toll on some.
    As his mentor used to say “buy it from my estate”

  50. Gary Hunley

    interested in the 41-48 cad ambulance, price info?
    Thanks
    Gary

    Like 1
  51. Pete

    610-216-0045

    Like 1
  52. David

    Pete. You still have that rough condition 1971 full size ford convertible. 390 3 speed manual on column ? You mentioned last April to me. Hope all is well sir.

    • Pete

      Still here awiting a new owner

      Like 1
  53. Len

    Are any of those police cars left. Specifically the PA. State car and the late 70’s Monaco or Fury. Well then there are the early 90’s Caprice’s as well. I live in PA and would certainly like to look at some of the cars. Retired law enforcement and always wanted to have an old cruiser to dress up and keep in the garage to go to shows. Let me hear from ya Pete.

    • Pete

      Sorry for the delay in replying was sick OK now. Phone 610-216-0045. Happy to see you after virus thing dies down. Regards Pete

      Like 1
      • Nevadahalfrack Nevadahalfrack Member

        Good to know you’re ok, Pete. Stay well.

  54. William Dillon

    Pete, where is White Haven Pennsylvania? Near you?

    • Pete

      About 100 miles north of here.we are 45 miles north of Philadelphia

      Like 1
  55. Pete

    10-4 Thanks Pete

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