Possible Heirloom: 1923 Ford Model T Roadster

It is a testament to the regard that the motoring public held for Henry Ford’s beloved Model T that while 1923 marked the car’s 16th year in production, it was also the car’s most successful sales year. It was the only year in which the Model T broke the two million mark, with 2,011,125 cars being sold. This solid and clean Roadster hails from that production year and is located in Merrillan, Wisconsin. If you would like to get your hands on a true American icon, the Ford is listed for sale here on eBay. The listing has opened at $5,000, but there have been no bids to this point. There is also a BIN option available for anyone who wishes to bypass the entire auction process, and this has been set at $6,795.

During its production life, the Model T was available in a bewildering array of body styles, and those were simply the ones that Ford offered themselves. In addition, a Model T chassis could be sent off to a coachbuilder for the fitment of a custom body. This one wears a 2-door Roadster body, and it looks to be in really nice condition. There are a few marks and chips around the car, but no signs of any rust issues. It does come with a luggage rack on the driver’s running board complete with a suitcase. The passenger side running board features a genuine Ford toolbox, complete with the correct tools. The car features the “Turtle Deck” trunk, and this is in really nice order, both inside and out. The Ford’s vinyl top is also in fair condition, with only a couple of very small holes that will need to be attended to.

The next owner of the Model T isn’t going to need to spend a lot of time or money on the inside of the car. The interior and trim look to be in really nice condition, and while the trim might not be original, it does appear to be free of any rips or tears. The generally flat appearance of the seat cushions would also suggest that the padding which lies beneath the upholstery is not original, but the next owner might find it to be more practical on a daily basis. The dash is a model of simplicity, with the Ford not even featuring an odometer. The whole interior harks back to a less complicated era, and it really does demonstrate Henry Ford’s belief that the car should be as uncomplicated as possible, and that engineering was far more important to him than styling.

This is a 96-year-old car, and it still features its original, 96-year-old drive-train. This is a testament, once again, to Henry’s philosophy of providing solid engineering in his products. It also explains why by the time this particular car was built, nearly half the cars on the planet were Model Ts. These were a car that just couldn’t be killed. The 177ci 4-cylinder flathead engine in this car starts right up and runs perfectly. It doesn’t blow smoke, while the transmission also works perfectly. The magneto even works as it should, and given the fact that this car is fitted with a vaporizer carburetor, it will run on alternative fuels such as kerosene. Apart from the original horn, everything on the car works properly, and the owner does use the car on a regular basis.

This Ford Model T is not too far from celebrating a birthday. In 2023, this car will be 100-years-old, and it isn’t often that an opportunity comes along to own a car when it reaches that milestone. In addition, the sales success and ongoing love affair that the motoring public has with the Model T means that they are a pretty safe classic to own. There are plenty of manufacturers that continue to produce high-quality reproduction parts that mean that the Model T could conceivably be the first motor car in history to successfully celebrate its bicentenary as an active participant. That’s something to think about because if you bought this car, it really could be quite a family heirloom.

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Comments

  1. grant

    Love it.

    3
  2. 37hotrod

    Let me be the first…..perfect LS swap candidate. :-)

  3. Burger

    Wanted one of these since my earliest memories. Playing on a farm truck version, slumbering away in a barn, as a kid sealed the deal. T’s use drive tech like nothing made since the 20’s and require re-learning how to drive, so it took me decades to finally make the commitment to hunt down that truck I always wanted and become a dedicated T guy. All my other cars are for sale now. The T experience is far more fun and satisfying than any of my 50’s-60’s cars. Just got my hands on a T-powered buzz saw. Will be cutting firewood and hauling it out of the woods … all T-powered ! The reaction people have to seeing such an ancient still being used is priceless. Young and old, it puts a smile on everyone’s face.

    I would post a photo, but that option seems to have vanished ….

    2
  4. Bob McK Member

    Don’t know why, but I love these T’s. One of these days I am going to buy one. When I find the perfect deal.

  5. Burger

    As old cars go, black era T’s are stupidly inexpensive to buy and parts are easy to find and cheap too. Like owning a 57 Chevy or a Mustang, parts and tech are just a phone call and/or a credit card away.

    The real adjustment to the old car mentality is that they are slow and will never whip your head back from go-fast. They truly are little more than adult-size go-karts. But the charm will win a person over, if they let go of the need for speed.
    My TT will go 40 all day long on flat surfaces, but 20hp and limited brakes require on-task driving. In spite of it being built for roads that would not support speeds over 20mph, they are far more fun to own and drive than any other old car I’ve owned.

    1
  6. Rube Goldberg

    It’s pretty sad, but we all knew this day was coming, interest is kaputt on these. No bids at what seems like a great deal on a Model T. Coolant leak, and 1 in 100 today would know how to start or drive it. Best have a trailer because you can’t drive it anywhere today.

    • On and On On and On Member

      So true Rube, I sold a running driving as good as it ever ran 1928 car a year ago and your thoughts rang true. Very few could pull it out of the garage. Double clutch??? Whats that? It was no fun and borderline unsafe to try and drive in modern traffic. Poor acceleration a AND deceleration. No turn signals! The last time I drove it on a public road while I was hand signaling a left hand turn, a young woman must have thought I was waving her around as she floored it to pass me. Folks just don’t don’t know. I want to stay with this hobby, so I’m looking for a late 60s car, Brings back memories and has class and period cool but modern enough to have seat belts and turn signals and mechanical ability enough to defend itself in traffic.

      1
  7. Burger

    We all have our stim, our “hobby”, …. that stupid thing we spend money on to have fun. No one ever gets their money back out of movies, or golf, or boating, or ….. A person has to look at their hobbies as how much bang they get for the buck and not confuse a “hobby” with an investment or business. Those things are what we do during working hours to PAY for our pleasure time, … our hobbies. I’ve been doing old cars since before I got my driver’s license over 40 years ago. I wish I had gotten into T’s sooner. Other cars may be worth more, but they cost more to buy and restore. If driving a COOL old piece of Americana is what floats a person’s boat, you can’t do it better or cheaper than a Model T. You’ll never get your money out of it, but you’ll have more fun for the money spent than any other old car option IF you can embrace old and cool and slow.

    3
    • On and On On and On Member

      Well spoken my friend. I’m there.

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