Solid Project: 1960 Chevrolet Impala Nomad

Even with its baked paintwork, this 1960 Impala Nomad has a real “wow” factor about it. In fact, there will be plenty of readers who will contend that the appearance should be left as it is, and although my own preference would be for a full restoration, I can completely understand and respect their thinking. The Nomad is located in Tyngsboro, Massachusetts, and is listed for sale here on eBay. Bidding has found its way to $7,100, but the reserve hasn’t been met.

While we might be looking at an Ermine White car with a fair coating of surface corrosion, the Nomad is actually an extremely solid vehicle. Rust-through is confined to a small area on the bottoms of both quarter panels. The rest of the car, including the floors and frame, is really good, with only some surface corrosion present. The Rocket Wheels suit the Nomad nicely, while the roof rack, wind deflectors, and mirrors, are all genuine GM products.

It appears that the owner is using the Nomad on a fairly regular basis, and the interior is certainly serviceable as it is. However, at some point, the interior will require a full restoration. The UV rays that have baked the outside of the car have exacted a pretty heavy toll on the upholstery. The owner readily acknowledges this, and it would be interesting to see whether the next owner chooses to undertake a faithful restoration, or whether they decide to follow a different path.

Originally occupying the engine bay was a 348ci V8, but this has made way for a 283. The transmission is an automatic, but it isn’t clear what type. The Nomad was also originally fitted with air conditioning, but the hardware for it that would usually be found in the engine bay is missing. It is under the skin where the Nomad has received a lot of attention in recent times. The entire braking system has been replaced, and the car now features power front discs. In addition, the front end has undergone a full rebuild, including tie-rod ends, new idler and pitman arm, new ball joints, along with springs, shocks, and bushes. The rear springs and shocks have also been replaced, while the car wears a new dual exhaust. The owner says that the car now runs and drives really well, and with such an extensive list of work, this is no real surprise.

This 1960 Impala Nomad is a classic that can be driven and enjoyed immediately. Even in its current weathered state, it still has a great presence about it. If you owned it, would you restore the body and paint, or would you leave it basically as it is?

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Comments

  1. Chebby Member

    I understand not liking patina cars, but while we certainly see a lot of them for sale online, you don’t actually see them on the road that often. This would be cool either way.

    3
  2. dirtyharry

    There are no cracks in the dash!

    10
    • madbrit

      Steel doesn’t crack very easily……… LOL.

      Very rare to find one with the padded dash option, most were painted. Makes me laugh when I see someone has painted their 59 or 60 dash in white or other light shade and then wonder why they can’t see through the windshield in the daylight.

      9
      • Don Diego

        We can all reflect on that.

        22
  3. glen

    It needs paint, patina is rust! It might look interesting, but it needs a proper paint job.

    23
    • PatrickM

      Singing my song…

      2
  4. local_sheriff

    Seller has done some really beneficial improvements in the suspension/brake department. Judging by the frame corrosion I’m surprised its body seems to be in such intact condition – as if they came from two different cars.

    I love longroofs and it’s understandingly among the most sought after models. However it’s in a condition that EVERY surface needs attention to make it shine unless you go rat rod. I’m curious what the reserve is and what it’ll sell for? As it’s up to 8.2k as of writing I’m happy I’ve gathered up what I desire already…!

    4
  5. Jay E.

    While the wear gives it a nice look, it does not stop the rust deterioration. It is too nice of a car to let this continue. I say paint it, ( just not white!!!) it will be a much more desirable car after that. Love the roof rack. Even that has style not seen today.

    10
  6. Will Fox

    The purist in me says to do a frame-off resto, and find another 348 to drop in. Considering how solid it is, it’s the only way I would do it. I imagine the reserve is sky-high, being a Chevy.

    8
    • Miguel Member

      The most impressive part of this car was when you opened the hood and saw those 348 valve covers. Too bad it is gone.

  7. Gaspumpchas

    Great points guys. This would be great start- I’d get it inside asap to keep the rust away, much work but this baby in ermine white with the nomad trim would be breathtaking. I’d persevere to find a 348 4 speed for it. yoo would be upside down probably, but I love these old wagons. Dad had a 60 and a 67. good luck to the new owner!
    Cheers
    GPC

    6
  8. Bob C.

    Power brakes with dual master cylinder. How about upgrading to an alternator?

    2
    • local_sheriff

      Better: upgrade to an alternator with the generator look

      6
  9. 200mph

    Not an “Impala”, but yes, it has all the Impala exterior trim and interior.

    Chevy just called it “Nomad”, its was their top of the line 4-door wagon for 1958-61.

    I had one of these 283 2bbl with powerglide in my first car… a ’60 Impala convertible. It would willingly rev all the way to its 4200 rpm redline!

    1
  10. George

    I thought all nomads were two doors?

    1
    • Steven Ligac

      As did I…

      1
      • Miguel Member

        The name Nomad was even used on the later Malibu wagons of the late ’60s.

        1
  11. 200mph

    1955-57 were the two-door wagon everybody knows and loves.

    The name continued as explained above through 1961.

    6
  12. Steven Ligac

    Who in the Precious Name of the Risen Lord would replace a 348 with a 283? I must have much to learn about this situation cuz it befuddles my sensibility.

    4
    • Chebby Member

      It’s 1974 and you’re broke, driving an old-fashioned station wagon, and there’s hundreds of 283’s in the junkyards.

      11
      • Gaspumpchas Hulsizer

        Yeah Chebby!! Back when you could work on them, and nothing ran better than a 283!!!
        Cheers
        GPC

        4
  13. 200mph

    I grew up in central Conn… a ’60 Impala was my first car (in 1966).

    If this is a longtime Mass. car, the ravages of New England winter road salt have long ago damaged the frame, suspension, underbody, etc.

    I’d vote for either a frame off restoration or just leave it be. Anything in between just creates a huge money pit trying to chase issues as they arise.

    2
  14. Terrylee86

    200mph is right. A rose by any other name is still a rose. This is a station wagon and if the owner wants to call it a nomad, go ahead. 55-57 were the real two door Nomads that commands the big bucks. This is a 1960 Chevy station wagon, no matter what Chevy or the owner calls it. Any car of that vintage is rare because they rusted like crazy. We call it Michigan cancer.

    2
  15. Chuck

    Yup Terrylee, it is a station wagon just as the 55/57s were. Might want to take up the subject with GM!

    4
  16. LMK Member

    I like it and its potential….

    2
  17. stillrunners

    Factory Air car too….that was rare back in the day. We had one as well with the third seat and after our 56 Chevy wagon got hit in the left front.

  18. b-rad jeepster

    it says NOMAD on the side trim behind the airplane. So I will call it a Nomad

    10
  19. Miguel Member

    How about this car? Imagine the possibilities.

    2
  20. Miguel Member

    Here is a closer picture of the car.

    1

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