Inherited 1954 Chevrolet Corvette Custom

Corvette was Chevrolet’s answer to the popularity of European sports cars. Named for a small, nimble warship, and sporting a six-cylinder engine and two-speed automatic transmission, the Corvette was decidedly underpowered for its sporting name in its debut year of 1953. This was quickly fixed, and the Chevrolet Corvette quickly became “America’s sports car,” winning races and developing a huge following for its driving character. Now in its eighth generation, the Corvette is still produced but has little in common with its first-generation ancestor. You can find this first-generation 1954 Corvette, inherited from the seller’s father, here on eBay.

The condition of the frame is decent, and Corvettes have always been fiberglass so there’s never any rust on the body. The seller lists extensively what has been done to it, and I’ll get to the highlights later on in this listing. I’m concentrating on the supporting bits now. The frame is original, but the front brakes have been converted to discs with a dual master cylinder. The top needs a bit of work, but all of the hardware is there, and the polished stainless framed windows are present. The car is complete and ready to be driven. It could even be a stunning show car if you wanted to put the work into it.

Modification highlights include a 301 cubic inch small-block V-8 with upgraded heads and Offenhauser carburetors, TH400 automatic transmission, and a 3.90 rear end with Positraction. So what needs to be done with it? The car’s been sitting for more than a decade, so all of the stuff associated with that. Probably a new gas tank, need to fix sagging doors, and it will need new electrical work because the lights don’t light. But the car has been relatively well cared for in its 36 years with this family and just needs a little love to get going again. Inside, the interior is custom. It features a smaller diameter steering wheel, a new sound system, and all of the upholstery and trim look new.

Death is an inevitability in life. It’s one of the only things that everyone on the planet will experience, and yet it’s almost always shocking and sad when it happens to a loved one. We, the grand We with a capital W, tend to accumulate junk throughout our lives that get passed down. Most of this junk is worthless, but sometimes that junk takes the form of a beautiful 1954 Corvette. While I’m sad for the seller’s loss, they do find themselves with a truly unique car that has been well taken care of…and now you can, too.

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Comments

  1. leiniedude leiniedude Member

    Interesting routing on the fuel filter and radiator hoses.

    Like 2
  2. DRV

    It’s interesting they kept the original overflow tank !

    Like 1
  3. 370zpp 370zpp Member

    “We, the grand We with a capital W, tend to accumulate junk throughout our lives that get passed down.”

    So true, and even more sobering is this: You will never see a hearse with a trailer hitch.

    Like 8
    • leiniedude leiniedude Member

      Maybe not.

      Like 37
      • 370zpp 370zpp Member

        Ah, so perhaps it has been done.
        Now where did they drop off the trailer?

        Like 1
    • Don Sicura

      Maybe the undertaker was having a BOGO sale

      Like 4
  4. Evan

    “a 301 cubic inch small-block V-8”

    I’m familiar with the Pontiac 301. There was (very briefly) a 302 small block, in some Z28 Camaros. I’m not familiar with any sort of 301 ci small block Chevy.

    • Steve R

      When you use a standard bore 327 block and a 283 crank it comes to 301.xx cubic inches.

      That would not have been an uncommon build at one point in time. This car has various modifications which were popular at various points of time ranging from the 60’s through the 90’s, but no single overriding theme.

      Steve R

      Like 5
      • Chris M.

        Indeed so Steve. The design here seems to draw from a wide swath of eras in customization. And without an endearing appeal I might add…

        Like 1
      • Camaro guy

        Correct Steve they came out to 301.6 Hot Rodders rounded down to 301, Chevy rounded up to 302 otherwise same engine

        Like 1
    • Danny V. Johnson

      Evan, I thing there was a 310 CID small block in the late 70s. Maybe that’s what’s in there. It look great. I think the dual quads is a little over kill, for a car that light. the rest of the exterior and interior is done nicely. I love the color.

      Hum? I wonder what happened to the old Blue Fame engine.

    • Tort Member

      Very common back in the day that hot rodders put a 283 crank in a 4″ bore 327 block. 302 dz’s were offered in Camaro’s in 67/68/69.

      Like 5
      • 19sixty5 Member

        Just an FYI, the 69 Z/28 was the only DZ code engine, the 67/68 were MO codes, except the 67 with A.I.R. (Air Injection Reactor) smog systems, that was an MP code.

    • Frank

      283 bored 60 over gave you the 301, a very potent small block in the late fifty’s and early sixty’s

      Like 1
      • Steve R

        283 x .060 = 292

        283 x .125 = 301

        Steve R

        Like 6
      • moosie moosie

        I remember those 301″ Chevies, mostly ’55’s, running Gas class’s & Modified Production pulling SKY HIGH revs at the end of the 1/4 mile, SWEET SWEET MUSIC!!!! those later Z/28 Camaros with the 302’s didn’t quite sound the same but were equally as fast. The good old days.

        Like 4
  5. Raymond

    My hearse had a hitch, I assumed it was for really fat people….

    Like 2
  6. bobhess bobhess Member

    Slick car. I would get the oil cooler out from under the car and into the airflow through the grill. Bottom out and you’ve got a mess to clean up and possibly an engine to rebuild.

    Like 3
    • old beach guy

      That looks like a Transmission cooler. When in doubt, use zip ties!

      Like 4
      • Little_Cars Little_Cars Member

        Ridiculous location for an oil or transmission cooler! I expect the installer who chose that position never expected to inadvertently graze a speed bump or negotiate a concrete driveway apron at some speed. Looks silly there. The rubber lines no doubt open to all sorts of road debris and possible malicious behavior by vandals.

  7. John E. Klintz

    What an expensive way to destroy the value of a collectible first gen Corvette! Frankly it’s disgusting to those of us who prefer “originals” with the exception of the front disc brakes and dual master. Those are good ideas on any classic.

  8. Dennis Froelich

    A 301 is a 283 Chevy small block bored out. High revving small block.

  9. Gary Rhodes

    I think this would be a great car. Pop the body off, rebuild the suspension, clean and paint the frame and motor and reassemble. Leave the body paint alone and drive the snot out of it

    Like 2
  10. douglas hunt

    it is screaming for a 4speed…….

    Like 2
  11. Rj

    272 is a 265 bored .60 over
    287 is a 283 bored .30 over
    292 is a 283 bored .60 over
    301 is a 283 bored .125 over
    302 is a 327 with a 283 crank
    332 is a 327 bored .30 over
    337 is a 327 bored .60 over

    Like 5
    • Cadmanls Member

      Ok not even going to mention the engine size, but a high reving small block and a TURBO 400? Come on didn’t see that?
      Oh the carbs look to be AFB

  12. Cadmanls Member

    Ok not even going to mention the engine size, but a high reving small block and a TURBO 400? Come on didn’t see that? I like this car though

  13. t-bone BOB

    Ended: Jun 23, 2021
    Winning bid:US $33,599.00
    [ 8 bids ]

    Item location:Westphalia, Michigan

    Like 1

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